Books | Technology | World

'Distant Witness': Social Media's 'Journalism Revolution'

NPR | Feb. 4, 2013 11:22 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 4, 2013 12:59 p.m.

A shop in Tahrir Square is spray painted with the word Twitter after the government shut off internet access on February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

A shop in Tahrir Square is spray painted with the word Twitter after the government shut off internet access on February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

A shop in Tahrir Square is spray painted with the word Twitter after the government shut off internet access on February 4, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

In December 2010, protesters demanding better jobs for young people took to the streets of Tunisia and toppled their government.

When protests broke out across the Arab world, NPR senior strategist Andy Carvin followed the events from thousands of miles away in real time online.

In his book Distant Witness, Carvin explains how he cultivated social media sources into a new form of journalism where people on the ground controlled the news.

Carvin talks with NPR’s Neal Conan about the stories that spilled out to the entire world in real time. [Copyright 2013 NPR]

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus
Thanks to our Sponsors:
become a sponsor
Thanks to our Sponsors
become a sponsor