Arts

Man Emerges From Picasso's Painting 'The Blue Room'

NPR | June 17, 2014 8:21 a.m.

Contributed By:

Bill Chappell

A bearded man lurks beneath the surface of a famous Picasso painting. That’s the image brought to us by curators who used new technology to find details of a portrait the artist painted over when he created his famous “The Blue Room” in 1901.

The painting’s surface depicts a scene in Pablo Picasso’s studio in Paris, with a woman bathing between a window and a table. But a different scene lies underneath, as infrared and other analysis shows a man in a bow tie staring out from the canvas, his head propped on his hand.

“The Blue Room” is at the Phillips Collection in Washington. Researchers from the museum and other institutions recently showed the AP the newly uncovered details of what lies beneath the painting.

“It’s really one of those moments that really makes what you do special,” Phillips conservator Patricia Favero tells the AP. “The second reaction was, ‘Well, who is it?’ We’re still working on answering that question.”

The likely reason the canvas was reused, curators say, was that Picasso didn’t have the money to use a new canvas for each new work early in his career.

The AP says this isn’t the first time a different work has been found beneath a Picasso:

“A technical analysis of “La Vie” at the Cleveland Museum of Art revealed Picasso significantly reworked the painting’s composition. And conservators found a portrait of a mustached man beneath Picasso’s painting “Woman Ironing” at the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan.”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus
Thanks to our Sponsors:
become a sponsor
Thanks to our Sponsors
become a sponsor