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Arts & Life

50 Shades Of Shakespeare: How The Bard Used Food As Racy Code

NPR | April 24, 2016

The eggplant and peach emoji are standard code for racy thoughts these days, but food has been used for sexual innuendo for centuries. Shakespeare was a pro. (Happy Shakespeare Week!)

In Honor Of #NationalPoetryMonth: Your Favorite Poems About Food And Farming

NPR | April 24, 2016

Gastronomy and poetry are a natural pairing. After all, both provide necessary nourishment. We asked you to share your favorite selections about farming and food and gathered them up here.

The Gospel According To Wendell Berry, On Screen

NPR | April 24, 2016

America's foremost farmer-philosopher, Wendell Berry, is the subject of a new documentary. It celebrates the writer's work, and the rural community in Kentucky in which he's rooted.

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Books | Arts | Food

In Shakespeare's Plays, Mealtimes Were A Recipe For Drama

NPR | April 20, 2016 3:24 p.m.

It's difficult to name a play in which Shakespeare doesn't cook up a bit of conflict around the table. The juiciest plot twists often happened when characters gathered for a meal.

Books | Arts | Food | Entertainment

We Eat Tomatoes, Why Not Tornadoes? A New Kids' Book Clears Up The Confusion

NPR | April 20, 2016 5:21 a.m.

Can I Eat That? by food critic Joshua David Stein gets young readers curious about their food. And it's fun for adults, too!

Food

Mexican Chef Pati Jinich Wants To Change How You Think About Enchiladas

NPR | April 15, 2016 3:51 p.m.

Pati Jinich is a Mexican chef whose life in the U.S. has influenced her cooking. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with her about her latest cookbook, Mexican Today.

Books | Arts | Food

#NationalPoetryMonth: Verses That Celebrate Life On The Farm

NPR | April 13, 2016 10:45 a.m.

Work & Days, a new book of poetry from Tess Taylor, is a lyrical meditation on food and farming and what she calls "this fragile and ultimately, very necessary relationship we have with the earth."

Books | Arts | Food

For Kafka, Even Beer Came With Baggage

NPR | April 11, 2016 1:19 p.m.

Many of Kafka's darkest comedies appear rooted in the cowering relationship he had with his father. Their only true bonding was over beer.

History | Music | Food | 'Jazz Town': Portland's Golden Jazz Age

Swingin' Albina: An Oral History Of Portland’s Once Great Jazz Neighborhood

OPB | April 5, 2016 3:39 p.m.

Not so long ago, a small segregated neighborhood in Portland was home to one of the more fascinating and vibrant jazz scenes in the United States.

Arts | Food

Ceci N'Est Pas Ice Cream (Actually It's Lard And Food Coloring)

NPR | March 25, 2016 7:39 a.m.

A photo series exposes the cheats food stylists use to make dishes look so scrumptious in glossy magazines and cookbooks. Roast meats are glazed with motor oil, and milk is replaced with glue.

Books | Arts | Food

Gastronomy Of Genius: History's Great Minds And The Foods That Fueled Them

NPR | March 14, 2016 12:42 p.m.

From Pythagoras to Balzac, Darwin to Marie Curie, many a genius was inspired by certain edibles, repulsed by others — or had some very peculiar dining habits.

Arts | Food | Entertainment

Thin Mint Mashup: Grind Those Girl Scout Cookies Into Cheesecake

NPR | Feb. 29, 2016 12:57 p.m.

Many of us cheer Girl Scout season, but after plowing through several sleeves of Samoas, fatigue can set in. Here, Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful, offers recipes meant to rekindle the cookie love.

Arts | Food

'Luncheon In Fur': The Surrealist Teacup That Stirred The Art World

NPR | Feb. 11, 2016 11:01 a.m.

In 1936, the surrealist Meret Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions.

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Cooking With OPB

Recipes, tips and how-to's from around the Northwest.

Cooking | March 24, 2016