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Jen Bodendorfer


Jen Bodendorfer has worked as a freelance editor for 15 years, working with authors, publishers, and small businesses. An English major with a degree from Northern Illinois University, she's had a lifelong love affair with books, reading, and the English language.

Her interest in seeing the world has taken Jen all over the globe, from a yurt in Mongolia, to sleeping on a rooftop in Morocco, to braving the bone-chilling cold of Siberia and beyond. Her journeys afforded her the opportunity to indulge in another favorite pastime, photography. Her photographs have been featured in several travel-themed gallery shows.

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Recent Articles

Arts | NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Portland's Chapman Streetcar

In the late 1800s, cable cars were developing into an effective means of transportation in San Francisco. Portland followed suit, but the cable car system eventually proved to be too expensive of a system to maintain and were replaced by trolley cars.  

NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Klamath Chief

Over a 20-year period in the early 20th century, Edward S. Curtis took thousands of photos, including this one of a Klamath tribal member, as part of “the North American Indian project.” 

NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: 3 Boys

Entrepreneur and newspaperman Amos Voorhies took an impressive number of photos featuring everyday people in their natural surroundings — subject matter that was very unique for the time.

Arts | NW Life | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Thomas Condon With Fossil

Thomas Condon was often described as carrying a Bible in one hand and a geologist’s pick in another. He looked at the fossils he found as part of God’s work.

NW Life | Education | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Thomas Condon Lecturing On The Beach

University of Oregon geology professor Thomas Condon often lectured informally near Nye Beach where he and his wife, Cornelia, had a summer cottage.

Arts | NW Life | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Young Mark Rothko And Family

Markus Rothkowitz was just 10 years old when he and his family arrived in Portland from Latvia in 1913.

Arts | NW Life | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Menashe Shoes

Jewish immigrant Nessim Menashe arrived in the US in 1909 and traveled to the Pacific Northwest soon after. By 1914, he had established this small shop in NW Portland.

NW Life | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Women's Barracks At Hanford

During World War II, thousands of people streamed into Hanford in south central Washington to work on the biggest and most highly classified project of WWII, yet less than 1/10 of 1 percent knew what the plant was actually making.

NW Life | local | History

Oregon Historical Photo: Japanese-Americans in Portland

Dec. 7 is the 74th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. By May of 1942, Americans of Japanese descent were forced to live in internment camps in the U.S.

NW Life | local

Oregon Historical Photo: Block House On Columbia River

Photographed by Albert H. Wulzer on a trip to the Columbia Gorge, this block house was built by the army in 1856 to protect troops and settlers at Cascade Rapids. It was abandoned in 1861, coinciding with the start of the Civil War.

NW Life | Arts | Education | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Early Drawing Class At Portland Art Museum School

The Portland Art Museum opened in 1893 on the second floor of the Portland Library, housing no art, only a collection of art books. The museum opened the Portland Art Museum School in 1909.

NW Life

Oregon Historical Photo: Flooded Front Street, Downtown Portland

Portland, population 10,000 in 1870, was known as a wide open town. Gambling, alcohol, prostitution – anything went. In 1869, 200 liquor licenses were issued, one for every 40 people.

NW Life | local

Oregon Historical Photo: Ashland From The Air

November of this year marks the end of the 80th season of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland. Plays were first staged at the site of a former Chautauqua meeting hall and are still performed at that same site today.

NW Life | local

Oregon Historical Photo: Lung On With Sedan

Businessman Lung On was a critical part of the John Day community in the early 20th century. 

NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Cowgirl Thrown From Horse Named Silver

In 1929 a tragic accident resulted in women being banned from competing in the Round-Up for 70 years because the events were deemed too dangerous.

NW Life | local

Oregon Historical Photo: The Amusement Trail At The Lewis And Clark Exposition

The Lewis and Clark Exposition in 1905 brought countless visitors to Portland to marvel at the wonders of the fair. Portland, wanting to be viewed as a safe city, took precautions to protect the perceived vulnerable female population.

NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: The Bonneville Dam

The Army Corps of Engineers finished construction of the Bonneville Dam in 1937, and it began delivering electricity in 1938.

NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Integrated CCC Camp

FDR’s program, the Civilian Conservation Corps, gave jobs to young men during the Great Depression.

NW Life | local | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Columbia Saloon

Portland is known for good beer. It is a long tradition starting in the mid-1800s. Henry Weinhard paved the way for an industry which has turned into the Beervana we have today. 

NW Life | local | History | Oregon Historical Photo Of The Week

Oregon Historical Photo: Typists' Pool

Women in Oregon had suffrage since 1912, largely due to the tireless efforts of Abigail Scott Duniway.