World

Egypt Opens Murder, Conspiracy Investigation Against Morsi

NPR | July 26, 2013 5:54 p.m.

Contributed By:

Scott Neuman

Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi during a rally in Cairo on Friday held by the radical Islamist movement Hamas.

Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi during a rally in Cairo on Friday held by the radical Islamist movement Hamas.

AFP/Getty Images, Ahmad Gharabli

Egyptian prosecutors have accused ousted President Mohammed Morsi of conspiracy and murder, raising tensions as both Islamists and supporters of newly installed military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi turn out for street protests.

The surprise announcement of the charges against Morsi, who was removed in a coup on July 3, stem from his 2011 escape from Wadi Natroun prison that left 14 guards dead.

Judge Hassan Samir said Morsi conspired with Hamas to carry out “aggressive acts in the country.” Morsi was among about 30 members of the Muslim Brotherhood who broke out of prison in the final days of the regime of President Hosni Mubarak, who was forced to step down in February 2011.

The charges against Morsi are seen by his supporters as politically motivated. NPR’s Cairo Bureau Chief, Leila Fadel, speaking on Morning Edition, says there’s been a huge international pressure to release Morsi and the charges on Friday are “the first legal reason given” for his continued detention.

El-Sissi called on his supporters to turn out in street protests in what he’s described as a “war against terrorism” against Islamists.

The Associated Press reports:

“El-Sissi’s portrait pervaded the crowds of tens of thousands in Cairo’s central Tahrir Square: the smiling general in sunglasses on posters proclaiming “the love of the people,” a combination photo of the general and a lion on lanyards hanging from people’s necks, a picture of his face Photo-shopped into a 1-pound note of currency. …

Morsi’s Islamist backers, in turn, were packing their own rallies in Cairo and elsewhere Friday in what they called the day “to bring down the coup,” referring to el-Sissi’s July 3 deposing of Morsi, Egypt’s first freely elected president.”

Fadel says: “There’s a real fear that this will go from rival protests today to a serious crackdown in the coming days from the security forces.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus
Thanks to our Sponsors:
become a sponsor
Thanks to our Sponsors
become a sponsor