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In Connecticut, One Scientist Is Turning To DNA To Build Better Bees


Scientist Richard Cowles played a few rounds of "Where's Wanda?" as he looked for queen bees on a farm in Hamden. Cowles is working to crossbreed his bees to select for the best survivor traits. (Patrick Skahill/WNPR)

Scientist Richard Cowles played a few rounds of "Where's Wanda?" as he looked for queen bees on a farm in Hamden. Cowles is working to crossbreed his bees to select for the best survivor traits. (Patrick Skahill/WNPR)

Honeybees are making a comeback. After an alarming decline during the past 10 years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is reporting a 3 percent increase in commercial honeybee colonies in the U.S. since last year, and a 27 percent decline in the loss of hives from April through June from a year earlier.

But honeybees aren’t totally out of the woods. As Patrick Skahill (@ptskahill) from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports, one scientist in Connecticut is working with bee genes — tracking down honey bee “survivors” in the hopes of spreading their hardy DNA.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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