Environment | Science

Understanding Climate Change, With Help From Thoreau

NPR | Jan. 18, 2013 9:35 a.m.

Contributed By:

Elizabeth Shogren

Researchers in Massachusetts and Wisconsin are comparing modern flower blooming data with notes made by Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold. They're seeing many plants, including irises in the Boston area, blooming consistently earlier than in the writers' times.

Researchers in Massachusetts and Wisconsin are comparing modern flower blooming data with notes made by Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold. They're seeing many plants, including irises in the Boston area, blooming consistently earlier than in the writers' times.

Researchers in Massachusetts and Wisconsin are comparing modern flower blooming data with notes made by Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold. They're seeing many plants, including irises in the Boston area, blooming consistently earlier than in the writers' times.

Some of the most beloved nature writers of all time, Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold, are helping scientists learn how global warming will affect spring by using historical records to predict when flowers will bloom during especially hot years.

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