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U.S. Weighs Options On Syria After Reported Chemical Attack

NPR | Aug. 24, 2013 1:29 p.m. | Updated: Aug. 26, 2013 11:15 a.m.

Contributed By:

Scott Neuman

Female rebel fighters gather in Syria's northern city of Aleppo on Saturday to protest what they claim was a chemical attack by pro-government forces in a suburb of Damascus.

Female rebel fighters gather in Syria's northern city of Aleppo on Saturday to protest what they claim was a chemical attack by pro-government forces in a suburb of Damascus.

AFP/Getty Images, AFP

President Obama has been meeting with his national security team to discuss reports of the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons, a White House official said Saturday, amid strong hints that a U.S. military strike was on the table.

“We have a range of options available, and we are going to act very deliberately so that we’re making decisions consistent with our national interest as well as our assessment of what can advance our objectives in Syria,” the White House official, speaking on background, said.

The statement follows comments Friday by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel that the president has asked the Pentagon for options on Syria and that U.S. warships armed with cruise missiles were being repositioned in the Mediterranean.

Hagel said the Defense Department “has a responsibility to provide the president with options for contingencies, and that requires positioning our forces, positioning our assets, to be able to carry out different options — whatever options the president might choose.”

Obama, who has shown reluctance to intervene in Syria’s 2-1/2-year civil war has said that the use of chemical weapons would be a “red line” for the United States.

In June, the White House said it had “high confidence” of an attack involving deadly sarin gas that killed 100 to 150 Syrians.

Meanwhile on Saturday, Angela Kane, the United Nations disarmament chief, arrived in Damascus in hopes of persuading the government to allow a team to examine the site of Wednesday’s reported attack in Ghouta district, a suburb of the capital.

Syrian state television has suggested rebels are to blame for the attack this week. It said government soldiers “suffocated” as they tried to enter Jobar, one of the towns in the Ghouta district where chemical weapons are said to have been used.

That suggestion was echoed by Syria’s deputy prime minister, Qadri Jamil, who blamed the rebels.

Jamil told The Associated Press on Friday that he was personally in favor of the U.N. looking into the Ghouta incident.

“We don’t want to be like Iraq, opening our territory up to all sorts of investigators, going through our homes and bedrooms. Syria is a sovereign nation and will preserve its sovereignty,” he told the AP in an interview at the prime minister’s offices in the Damascus district of Kfar Sousseh.

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