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Electric Highway Aims To Spark More EV Use


The stations, called DC Quick Charge, use input voltages of 480 or 208, and can charge a car in about 20 to 30 minutes.

The stations, called DC Quick Charge, use input voltages of 480 or 208, and can charge a car in about 20 to 30 minutes.

Jamie Lusch/Mail Tribune

John Becker’s battery-powered Ford Focus is primarily a get-around-town vehicle.

The electric car serves its purpose for daily commutes, requiring a charge every 100 miles or so, but it’s not his go-to when it comes to longer commutes — say to Portland or Salem. It’s a decision he suspects is shared by many other electric car owners, and why Oregon Driver and Motor Vehicle Services data shows only 6,103 of the 3 million-plus registered vehicles statewide are not powered by gasoline.

“I think right now the range anxiety and the cost is keeping some people from buying the (electric) car,” says Becker, a Rogue Valley Clean Cities board member and retired Oregon Department of Environmental Quality air quality manager. “But long-term, as used ones come on the market and people become more comfortable with the technology, more people will begin to see the benefit.”

That “range anxiety” is something Oregon Department of Transportation officials are hoping to change for electric vehicle owners over the next few years, part of a plan to get at least 3.3 million zero-emission cars on the roads in Oregon, California and six East Coast states by 2025, according to an ODOT report.

Read more at the Mail Tribune.

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