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Recreational Marijuana Measure Passes In Oregon


2014 Measure 91 - Legalize Marijuana

Allows adults in Oregon to grow, possess, and sell marijuana under state regulation.

A bag of recreational pot sold at Main Street Marijuana in Vancouver, Wash.

A bag of recreational pot sold at Main Street Marijuana in Vancouver, Wash.

John Rosman/OPB

Measure 91, which would allow adults in Oregon to grow, possess and sell marijuana under state regulation, has passed. That makes Oregon the fourth major U.S. jurisdiction to legalize recreational use of pot - after Colorado and Washington last year and Washington, D.C., earlier on Tuesday.

Marijuana legalization has been a long-standing issue in Oregon. In 1986, a failed measure first sought to legalize recreational pot. It was rejected by a large majority of voters. The issue came up again in 2010 through the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act, but the Oregonians for Cannabis Reform campaign failed to collect enough signatures to put it on the ballot. Oregon voters then rejected a marijuana legalization measure in 2012.

Measure 91 supporters await election results at Holocene in Portland Tuesday.

Measure 91 supporters await election results at Holocene in Portland Tuesday.

In June, pro-marijuana legalization group New Approach Oregon turned in more than 145,000 signatures to get Measure 91 on the ballot, a 57,000-signature cushion over the minimum required.

A recent poll by OPB and KPTV showed a slight majority of Oregon voters favored legalizing recreational marijuana.

The measure drew endorsements from former U.S. Attorney Kris Olson, former Oregon Supreme Court Justice Bill Riggs, public television host Rick Steves and King County Sheriff John Urquhart.

Organizations against the measure supported the No on 91 campaign, including the American Medical Association, the Oregon State District Attorney’s Association and the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association.

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