Environment

Scientists Discuss Radioactive Contamination At Washington Conference

Northwest Public Radio | Sept. 23, 2009 9:46 a.m. | Updated: July 17, 2012 1:09 a.m. | Richland, WA

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By Anna King

Two-hundred-and-fifty-five heads are better than one. That's especially true when you're talking about how radioactive contamination moves through the environment at sites like Hanford.

Top-level scientists from all over the world are meeting this week in Kennewick to exchange their most recent findings. Richland Correspondent Anna King reports.


It's called the Migration Conference. And even informal discussions here could help in the development of finding new ways to clean up contaminated sites like Hanford or the Nevada Test Site.

Many of these scientists work on the molecular scale, trying to figure out how different soils, chemicals and radioactive elements interact.

David Clark from Los Alamos National Laboratory helped organize the conference.

David Clark: “The whole point of getting down to the molecular scale is to really get enough information to inform decision makers about what they need to do.”

Clark says Hanford is just one of many sites across the world with left over contamination from the Cold War.

This is the first time the Migration Conference is meeting near Hanford.

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