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11 climate-change concerns for the Northwest

Ecotrope | Nov. 10, 2010 12:11 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 19, 2013 1:44 p.m.

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As the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service launches its eight regional landscape conservation cooperatives, the agency is looking to fill data gaps on the effects of climate change in different regions of the country.

As the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service launches its eight regional landscape conservation cooperatives, the agency is looking to fill data gaps on the effects of climate change in different regions of the country.

Michael Carrier, Gov. Ted Kulongoski’s longtime natural resource policy director, has been appointed to lead the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative – a partnership that will seek out the science needed to respond to climate change and other threats to fish and wildlife.

Covering the Pacific Coast from northern California to Anchorage, the NPLCC is one of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s eight regional landscape conservation cooperatives. The Obama administration launched the co-ops last year to pool government, tribal and non-governmental resources, fill gaps in scientific data and find ways to armor fish and wildlife against the threats of climate change across the landscape.

In announcing Carrier’s appointment, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Pacific Region Director Robyn Thorson provided a concise list of the climate-change threats his agency is concerned about in the Northwest, and that the co-op will focus on:

  1. Rising sea levels
  2. Widespread melting of snow and ice
  3. Changes in ocean currents and precipitation patterns
  4. Ocean acidification
  5. Coastal erosion
  6. More flooding
  7. New exotic species invasions
  8. New disease outbreaks
  9. Disrupted food webs
  10. Loss of intact plant communities
  11. More species extinctions

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« A check-up on wind-farm health effects

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Q&A: Mike Carrier, natural resource policy adviser »

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