Agriculture | Ecotrope

Are You Making Your Thanksgiving Sustainable?

Ecotrope | Nov. 16, 2012 3:20 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 19, 2013 1:28 p.m.

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I stumbled upon an opportunity to buy a 12-pound, heritage breed, pasture-raised turkey from a farm just south of Portland this year. I interviewed the farmer who raised it about the choices she makes to use organic feed, to avoid using any antibiotics, to let the turkeys roam and roost in trees and to chase grasshoppers and butterflies. It was a more environmentally friendly option that cost $5 a pound. Are you doing anything to make your Thanksgiving more sustainable?

I stumbled upon an opportunity to buy a 12-pound, heritage breed, pasture-raised turkey from a farm just south of Portland this year. I interviewed the farmer who raised it about the choices she makes to use organic feed, to avoid using any antibiotics, to let the turkeys roam and roost in trees and to chase grasshoppers and butterflies. It was a more environmentally friendly option that cost $5 a pound. Are you doing anything to make your Thanksgiving more sustainable?

Are you doing anything to make your Thanksgiving holiday environmentally friendly?

I’ve put a call out to OPB’s Public Insight Network for examples of how people are making their Thanksgiving meals more sustainable. I’ll post the responses next week. You can chime in with a comment on this page or submit your comments on this form.

Last week, I happened upon an opportunity to buy a heritage breed, pasture-raised, organically fed turkey from a farm about 35 miles south of Portland.

Of course, I had to interview the farmer to get the scoop on what makes this bird so special. Her name is Kendra Kimbirauskas, and she explained how her heritage turkeys enjoy living outside, as opposed to the close indoor quarters where conventional turkeys are raised. They eat organic feed and they don’t need any antibiotics to keep them healthy.

“They want to run around and eat grasshoppers and chase butterflies and they want to roost outside,” she said. “Our birds roost in trees, for example. They’re comfortable being outside And your modern industrial turkey would probably have a hard time surviving in an outdoor environment.”

I’ll be posting more from our interview later.

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