Fish & Wildlife | Ecotrope

Deadly salmon virus found again in B.C. fish

Ecotrope | Nov. 7, 2011 7:14 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 19, 2013 1:34 p.m.

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How many wild salmon in the Northwest are infected with the deadly infectious salmon anemia virus? A new test shows more cases in British Columbia, but state and federal agencies in the U.S. are going to do their own screenings to find out more.

How many wild salmon in the Northwest are infected with the deadly infectious salmon anemia virus? A new test shows more cases in British Columbia, but state and federal agencies in the U.S. are going to do their own screenings to find out more.

The AP reports another case of infectious salmon anemia (ISA) has been found in British Columbia – this time in wild Fraser River salmon.

The story also explains the ongoing debate over the tests that found the virus in two young BC sockeye last month:

“At the same time, salmon farmers on both sides of the international border have been highlighting the work of a Norwegian expert who got slightly different results when he tested for the virus, infectious salmon anemia (ISA), in the first two young sockeye.

So, is there a fish crisis, or isn’t there?

In a word: maybe.”

The ISA virus is known for wiping out more than half the farmed salmon in Chile, and nobody knows how damaging it might be to the precious wild stocks in the Pacific Northwest.

But there is a significant question as to whether the original two B.C. fish actually had the virus. The only two labs to test them came up with different results.

To be safe, state and federal agencies in the U.S. are planning to start screening hatchery, farmed and wild salmon in the Northwest.

Is there a salmon crisis in Oregon and Washington?

Maybe only time will tell…

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