Environment | Communities | Oregon | Ecotrope

More On The 'Tiny' Beat: Tiny Doors In Trees

Ecotrope | April 11, 2013 11:41 a.m. | Updated: April 11, 2013 1:32 p.m. | Portland

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This week we’ve been covering the transcontinental feud brewing over the world’s smallest park. Portland’s Mill Ends Park currently holds the title, but Princes Park in the U.K. has issued a challenge.

We’ve also reported on all kinds of tiny, small and modular homes, from a sustainability and energy consumption perspective.

Grist recently posted about another debate raging in San Francisco over a tiny door in a tree at Golden Gate Park. Where did it come from? Who lives there? What’s the difference between a gnome and an elf?

Well, San Francisco doesn’t have the only tiny door. In my Northeast Portland neighborhood, I regularly see two magical tree doors.

This fairy house belongs to Ragizo, an elf who lives and plays with friends in his very elaborate garden, which includes a hotel, a Ferris wheel and an archery field.

This fairy house belongs to Ragizo, an elf who lives and plays with friends in his very elaborate garden, which includes a hotel, a Ferris wheel and an archery field.

Toni Tabora-Roberts / EarthFix

This one belongs to Ragizo, an elf who lives and plays with friends in his very elaborate garden, which includes a hotel, a ferris wheel and an archery field (holdover from the elf Olympics which happened concurrent to the official Olympics). He also has incoming and outgoing mailboxes to correspond with folks in the neighborhood. (He responds very promptly. My niece and nephew wrote him and he replied within the week. Pretty nifty community engagement.)

This garden — including tiny door — was put in to welcome neighborhood fairies. It’s got a little house and a fancy, tiny tea service.

This garden -- including tiny door -- was put in to welcome neighborhood fairies.

This garden -- including tiny door -- was put in to welcome neighborhood fairies.

Toni Tabora-Roberts / EarthFix

There’s a question about whether or not these doors hurt the trees. Depending on how they are installed, it could, but that would take a little more investigation.

In the meantime, these magical little scenes in our neighborhood gardens seem like a great way to get kids young and old outside and enchanted with fairies, elves and nature.

Do you have experience interacting with something tiny in your environment? Let us know!

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