Energy | Ecotrope

Oregon LNG Submits Natural Gas Export Plans

Ecotrope | July 3, 2012 8:25 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 19, 2013 1:31 p.m.

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Oregon LNG has proposed eliminating the Washington County segment of its proposed natural gas import pipeline, which starts in Warrenton. Instead, the company is proposing a two-way pipeline that would cut through Clatsop and Columbia County before making its way to Cowlitz County across the Columbia River in Washington.

Oregon LNG has proposed eliminating the Washington County segment of its proposed natural gas import pipeline, which starts in Warrenton. Instead, the company is proposing a two-way pipeline that would cut through Clatsop and Columbia County before making its way to Cowlitz County across the Columbia River in Washington.

Today Oregon LNG submitted a preliminary application to export liquefied natural gas from its proposed LNG import terminal site in Warrenton. The new project plans include adding liquefaction capability to the Warrenton site to build a facility that can both import and export LNG.

The plans also include a major change in the proposed pipeline route, adding 39 new miles of pipeline and eliminating 75 miles of the proposed route, according to the filing documents. The company wants to make the pipeline bidirectional, as well, so it can carry gas to the export terminal or from the import terminal.

Oregon LNG initially planned a pipeline that would run from Warrenton to Molalla – across Clatsop and Columbia counties. The new plan keeps the route through Clatsop County but eliminates the Washington County section of the pipeline. Instead, the new pipeline would cross Columbia County and make its way across the Columbia River to Cowlitz County in Washington.

In its filing with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Oregon LNG reports plans to file a new application to build an LNG import/export terminal early next year. The new project plans reduce the facility’s import capacity, removing an LNG storage tank and reducing the capacity for reheating LNG to gas form.

The company plans to have all its operations up and running by early 2019, with 1.3 billion cubic feet per day of export capacity and .5 billion cubic feet of import capacity.

To meet the needs for Oregon LNG’s additional gas supply, the natural gas transmission pipeline operator Williams has proposed a Washington Expansion Project. The project would increase natural gas transmission capacity by adding 136 miles of new pipe inside or near the company’s existing pipeline right of way.

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