Land | Transportation | Ecotrope

The $600,000 hybrid and other plush green cars

Ecotrope | Nov. 15, 2010 2:48 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 19, 2013 1:44 p.m.

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A whole new kind of hybrid. The Porche 918 Spyder plug-in hybrid gets 78 miles per gallon for a price tag expected to be more than $600,000. With 2,300 pre-order pledges, the car may be on the road by 2013.

A whole new kind of hybrid. The Porche 918 Spyder plug-in hybrid gets 78 miles per gallon for a price tag expected to be more than $600,000. With 2,300 pre-order pledges, the car may be on the road by 2013.

Even superluxury cars are going green. The Wall Street Journal reports Ferrari, Porsche, Bentley and other luxury carmakers are finally taking a stab at improving fuel efficiency and reducing emissions.

I thought I’d share a quick list of the new models coming out, though the story notes these cars will have little environmental impact because they’re sold in such small numbers and many will still emit more carbon dioxide than ordinary vehicles:

  1. Ferrari California with HELE System: $251,000, 20.45 miles per gallon, a start-stop system uses new technology, to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 23 percent in city driving. Savings come in part from shutting off the engine at stoplights.
  2. Bentley Continental GT Coupe will offer an optional V8 engine that will emit up to 40 percent less carbon dioxide than the 12-cylinder model. Bentley is also making all its new models ethanol-fuel ready.
  3. Porsche 918 Spyder plug-in hybrid: $682,260 projected price tag, up to 78 miles per gallon.
  4. BMW Vision Efficient Dynamics: 62.5 miles per gallon, puts out 159 grams of CO2 permile compared with 411 grams per mile in the average U.S. vehicle.
  5. Mercedes SLS AMG (electric): Parent company Daimler says by 2013 it may produce a limited number of electric-powered versions of the SLS AMG.

By comparison, a 2011 Toyota Prius, $23,000 to $28,000, 51 miles per gallon city, 48 mpg highway and emits 143 grams of CO2 per mile.

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