Fish & Wildlife | Ecotrope

Wolverines update: Three confirmed in Oregon

Ecotrope | Aug. 1, 2011 4:41 a.m. | Updated: Feb. 19, 2013 1:36 p.m.

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A baited camera offered the first confirmed sighting of a wolverine in Oregon in 19 years on April 2. After reviewing all the footage and other data, officials believe this is just one of three wolverines that have been spotted in Oregon.

A baited camera offered the first confirmed sighting of a wolverine in Oregon in 19 years on April 2. After reviewing all the footage and other data, officials believe this is just one of three wolverines that have been spotted in Oregon.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife just sent out this update on the wolverines recently caught on camera in Oregon. After reviewing camera footage, DNA and tracks, officials now say there are three different wolverines in Oregon. Two of them are immature males, one is a “probable male.” One has DNA that matches wolvering populations in Idaho and Montana. From ODFW:

On April 22, 2011, five days after discovering wolverine tracks in in the Eagle Cap Wilderness of the Wallowa Mountains, researcher Audrey Magoun downloaded photos of two wolverines from a bait station camera, the first known photographs of the species in Oregon. A set of tracks discovered on April 17 was the first confirmation of a wolverine in Wallowa County, according to ODFW wildlife biologist Vic Coggins. The news generated a lot of interest among Oregonians and throughout the northwest.

The 2010 winter survey that resulted in the discovery has now been wrapped up. In June, all cameras and bait stations were picked up by the crew. Analysis shows that during the survey three different wolverines were photographed on six different cameras.

According to Magoun, two of the wolverines were verified as immature males and the third is a probable male. DNA analysis of hair samples indicates that one male is genetically related to wolverines in the Idaho-Montana population. Wolverine tracks were detected in the snow at seven locations during aerial track surveys, and researchers hope to continue the project in the winter of 2011-12 if funding is secured.”

 

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