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Clouds Over Oregon Could Cover Part Of Solar Eclipse Path


An annular solar eclipse is seen through clouds over Eugene on Sunday, May 20, 2012. The annular eclipse, in which the moon passes in front of the sun leaving only a golden ring around its edges, was visible to wide areas across China, Japan and elsewhere in the region before moving across the Pacific to be seen in parts of the western United States.

An annular solar eclipse is seen through clouds over Eugene on Sunday, May 20, 2012. The annular eclipse, in which the moon passes in front of the sun leaving only a golden ring around its edges, was visible to wide areas across China, Japan and elsewhere in the region before moving across the Pacific to be seen in parts of the western United States.

Rob Romig/The Register-Guard

The Aug. 21 total solar eclipse is expected to draw a million additional people to Oregon — one of the best states for eclipse viewing. But there’s a good chance that morning clouds will obscure the main event in some prime locations, particularly on the coast, according to the National Centers for Environmental Information and the National Weather Service.

For example, there’s a 56 percent chance that one of four types of clouds could obscure the eclipse in Newport, with a 51 percent chance of a heavy overcast. The three other potential cloud covers range from a few clouds to scattered or broken cloud cover.

In Eugene, there’s an estimated 61 percent chance that the eclipse will be visible, with a 40 percent chance that the skies will be completely clear.

Eugene is not in the “path of totality,” the 62-mile-wide strip where, weather permitting, people will be able to see the moon pass in front of the sun. In Oregon, the event begins at 10:15 a.m. and lasts until 10:25 a.m. Totality, which lasts up to two minutes, happens when the moon blots out the sun and becomes a dark orb, surrounded by the sun’s glowing corona.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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