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opbmusic's Weekend Fix: Pure Bathing Culture, Raury, and The Gods Themselves


Raury (Raury Deshawn Tullis) released his debut album All We Need this month.

Raury (Raury Deshawn Tullis) released his debut album All We Need this month.

Courtesy of Raury


Each Friday our staff shares an eclectic mix of new music that’s recently debuted on the broadcast at opbmusic. This weekend we highlight a Portland pop duo, a precocious talent from Atlanta who blends hip-hop, folk, and soul, and good old fashioned stoner rock from Seattle.

Pure Bathing Culture – Darling, Save Us

Portland duo Pure Bathing Culture step out of their comfort zone on their latest album, Pray For Rain. The gossamer indie pop band have peeled back a few layers to reveal a simpler version of themselves. Their fleeting and romantic track “Darling, Save Us” is a testament to their newfound clarity. Singer Sarah Verspille sings a delicate melody over an unadorned beat before the piece is suddenly propelled into more dynamic territory.
 
Raury – Crystal Express

Part of a generation that easily consumes disparate genres, 19 year-old Atlanta singer-songwriter Raury blends hip-hop, folk, and soul on his debut album, All We Need. The bold-thinking teenager may be young, but he’s clear about the positive message he wants to send with his music. “Crystal Express” showcases this optimism best with Raury’s easygoing vocals and lyrics repeatedly encouraging his listeners to ride the metaphorical crystal express. Because, of course he says, “We all need light.”
 
The Gods Themselves – Tangerines
The blunt, funky bassline opening Seattle band The Gods Themselves’ new album Pink Noise plunges its listeners into an angular lo-fi rock experience. The song attached to this thick tone is “Tangerines.” It’s an in-your-face dance rock jam that recalls artists from Black Sabbath to Portland’s own Beth Ditto. The song reveals singer Astra Elane’s fondness for orange fruit and puts the emphasis on impressively vivid vocals that any 70s era metalhead would envy.

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