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Paul Loofburrow

Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me Comes to Portland

OPB | June 12, 2007 4:17 a.m. | Updated: Dec. 5, 2013 11:14 a.m.

June 13, 2007, Portland, OR – WAIT WAIT … DON’T TELL ME!®, the irreverent and oddly informative radio news quiz program from NPR, will bring its comedic take on the week’s headlines to the Portland Center for the Performing Arts on Thursday, June 28 at 7:30pm. Oregon Public Broadcasting is presenting the already sold-out live stage show, and will air the program on Saturday, June 30 at 11:00am.

Gert Boyle, chairman of the board of Columbia Sportswear Company, will join in on the act as the show’s “Not My Job” contestant. Boyle will answer questions outside her area of expertise to try to win a prize for a listener, joining a growing roster of esteemed “Not My Job” players, such as Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, Senators Barack Obama and John McCain, actor Tom Hanks, and former Secretary of State Madeline Albright.

“We’re pleased to welcome WAIT WAIT back to Portland,” said Lynne Clendenin, vice president of Radio Programming at OPB. “Oregonian listeners love this show, a fact well illustrated by the fact the tickets sold out quickly when they were released. And Gert Boyle, a national as well as an Oregon icon, is a perfect local addition to the mix.”

Now in its 10th year, WAIT WAIT … DON’T TELL ME! offers a contemporary and sometimes raucous twist on the old-time radio quiz show, mining NPR news stories for its quiz questions. The program is hosted by Peter Sagal, an award-winning playwright, and features legendary NPR newscaster Carl Kasell as official judge and scorekeeper. Panelists participating in the two-hour live show will be humorist, screenwriter and author Roy Blount, Jr.; Amy Dickinson, an author and syndicated newspaper advice columnist; and Adam Felber, a New York-based writer and performer.

The live show will include WAIT WAIT’s take on the week’s news that’s the trademark of the weekly radio show. Panelists and callers will answer questions about the news, “fill in the blank” at lightning speed, sniff out fake news items, decipher limericks, and banter about the week’s weirdest events. Callers compete for the most coveted prize in public radio: a home answering machine greeting custom-recorded by Kasell. Listeners can get in on the action by calling 888-WAIT-WAIT.

WAIT WAIT … DON’T TELL ME! airs on more than 400 NPR member stations, reaching 2.3 million listeners weekly. It has also ranked among the “Most Downloaded” podcasts on iTunes and other directories since it was made available in February 2006. The show is produced by NPR and Chicago Public Radio; Doug Berman is Executive Producer.

WAIT WAIT … DON’T TELL ME! is broadcast on OPB on Saturdays at 11am. The show from the Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland will be broadcast nationwide the weekend of June 30.

About OPB

OPB is the state’s most far-reaching and accessible media resource, providing free access to programming for children and adults designed to give voice to community, connect Oregon and its neighbors and illuminate a wider world. Every week, over 1.5 million people tune in to or log on to OPB’s Television, Radio and Internet services. As the hub of operations for the state’s Emergency Broadcast and Amber Alert services, OPB serves as the backbone for the distribution of critical information to broadcasters and homes throughout Oregon. OPB is one of the largest producers and presenters of national television programming through PBS, and is also a member station of NPR, Public Radio International (PRI), and American Public Media (APM).
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