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Haiti: Where Did The Money Go?


Program Description

When a 7.0 earthquake devastated the island nation of Haiti, people across the world responded more generously than to any disaster in history. In the United States alone, one out of every two households contributed a total of $1.4-billion in aid.

Yet almost two years after the earthquake, hundreds of thousands of Haitians still lack basic necessities: food, drinking water, latrines, and adequate shelter.

HAITI: WHERE DID THE MONEY GO? asks the pivotal question—why  did so much money buy so little relief?

Premiere

Released by NETA to public television stations on January 10, 2012 in time for the two-year anniversary of the Haiti earthquake.

Production Notes

On January 12th, the 2-year anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, producer Michele Mitchell brings her documentary directly to the people who live in the camps that surround Port au Prince.

Press Materials

Press Release

Michele Mitchell - Biography

YouTube Preview (link)

Caribbean Journal Interview (link)

Images

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It's been nearly two years since the earthquake flattened Haiti, yet more than 600,000 people still live under tattered tarps, many with no access to drinking water, inadequate sanitation and increasing disease.

Film At Eleven

It’s been nearly two years since the earthquake flattened Haiti, yet more than 600,000 people still live under tattered tarps, many with no access to drinking water, inadequate sanitation and increasing disease.

Although people gave billions of dollars to help the victims of the Haiti earthquake, only 7% of the people in the camps have access to drinking water.

Film At Eleven

Although people gave billions of dollars to help the victims of the Haiti earthquake, only 7% of the people in the camps have access to drinking water.

Sanitation in the camps is woefully inadequate with only one toilet for every three hundred people.

Film at Eleven

Sanitation in the camps is woefully inadequate with only one toilet for every three hundred people.

When the crew returned to the camps 20 months after the quake, few Haitians wanted to talk to them. They'd seen too many camera's come and go, and still no change in sight.

Film at Eleven

When the crew returned to the camps 20 months after the quake, few Haitians wanted to talk to them. They’d seen too many camera’s come and go, and still no change in sight.

Michele Mitchell is an award-winning broadcast journalist known for her political investigative work which has taken her to some dicey parts of the world.

Michele Mitchell

Michele Mitchell is an award-winning broadcast journalist known for her political investigative work which has taken her to some dicey parts of the world.

 

 

 

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