Oregon Considered

'My Family, My Culture'

May 19, 2005

0519_viet.jpgThis spring marks 30 years since the fall of South Vietnam and 28 years since US troops withdrew. What may have been a political necessity for the United States felt like betrayal to the South Vietnamese, including one man who now makes his home in Portland.

As part of OPB's occasional series on immigrants and their journeys to Oregon, we track Trinh Li -- from his time as a soldier in Southeast Asia to his life in Southeast Portland.

As Rob Manning reports, this "New Oregon Trail" story is already familiar at one Portland middle school, thanks to a film project directed by Trinh's son, Viet.

complete article...

Also on Thursday's Oregon Considered

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Investigation Underway on Downtown Police Shooting

Split Decision in Downwinders Case

Globalized Joblessness

COMMENTS

Can you tell me where to find that nice little story on your radio today (June 1) about 6p.m. or shortly after that talked about what the physicist would say at the guys funeral for his father,mother and wife. It was great. Thanks, Marge

Posted by: Marge at June 1, 2005 11:01 PM

Marge,

Sounds like you're after this commentary.

Planning Ahead Can Make a Difference in the End
Aaron Freeman gives advice for planning your funeral.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4675953

It's up on the NPR All Things Considered page for the June 1 show at http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=2&prgDate=1-Jun-05.

Michael Clapp
Web Editor
Oregon Public Broadcasting

Posted by: Michael Clapp at June 2, 2005 08:53 AM