Oregon Considered

MONTHLY ARCHIVE

« July 2006 | | September 2006 »

8/31/2006 - A Tale Of Two Neighborhoods

Two of Portland's neighborhoods are undergoing radical transformations, with housing designed to attract residents from very different income brackets. Both developments have received public funding in the form of subsidies or tax breaks, and both include a range of prices in an attempt to create some income diversity.

But the high-end South Waterfront development is as different as can be from New Columbia, a newly-remodeled neighborhood for low-income to middle-income families. Kristian Foden-Vencil profiles the new South Waterfront, and Rob Manning profiles New Columbia.

Read Rob Manning's story...

Read Kristian Foden-Vencil's story...





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Also on Thursday's Oregon Considered
Yearlong Legal Battle Finally Gets Its Day In Court
Record-Setting 'Kicker' Refund Expected
Click here to listen to Eve Epstein's conversation with Mark Russell

Posted by Casey

8/30/2006 - Wind Power In Your Own Back Yard

windpower2.jpgNow you too can generate your own wind power. A small company in Newberg, Oregon is making and selling residential-sized wind turbines. But there are lots of details to consider. Not the least of which: the high purchase price and what the neighbors will think.

Read the entire article...



Also on Wednesday's Oregon Considered
Live Cultures Compliments Of The Counter-Culture
OR Gas Prices Remain Higher Than National Average
Meet Jefferson High's Newest Principal

Posted by Casey

8/29/2006 - "Alphabet Houses" Part Of Hanford Heritage

1899517.jpgThe Hanford nuclear site rose out of the sagebrush of Richland, Washington, in the 1940s. So did thousands of houses built for Hanford workers. They're called the Alphabet Houses. Richland correspondent Carol Cizauskas explains from the Alphabet House she calls home.

Read the entire article...

Also on Tuesday's Oregon Considered
Limited Housing Funds Allocated Through Lottery
NW Coast Faces Development Boom
Legal Arguments Continue In Charity Wiretapping Case

Posted by Casey

8/28/2006 - Students Ready For School; Schools Aren't

As parents all over the state are getting their kids back in school mode, educators are trying to get their buildings ready. In many Oregon districts, they'll be opening the doors to overcrowded classrooms. Districts from Bend to Medford to Forest Grove are asking voters for help this fall with construction bonds.

The requests total nearly a billion and a half dollars - but that number could rise. The filing deadline is September 7th. As Rob Manning reports, much of the bond for North Clackamas' schools would pay for repairs to the area's aging buildings.

Read the entire article...

Also on Monday's Oregon Considered
Kulongoski Wants Measure 48 Debate With Backer
U.S. Pollution Law Targets Canadian Smelter
Fun For Canines At New Dog Park
What's Killing Bighorn Sheep?

Posted by Casey

8/24/2006 - Through The Rabbit Hole And Into The Trees

0824_awol2.jpgThe A-WOL dance company is swinging from the trees this weekend. A-WOL stands for Aerial Without Limits, and members of this dance collective will take to the air on a trapeze, a ladder, fabric, anything they can find to defy gravity.

Friday and Saturday, they'll hang from the branches to perform their interpretation of "Alice in Wonderland," at the Mary S. Young State Park in West Linn.

- View an audio slideshow of the A-WOL rehersal

Also on Thursday's Oregon Considered
Constitution Party Candidate Will Remain On Ballot For Governor
Elder Suicide Is A Hidden Social Problem
Idaho Convenes Special Session On Property Taxes

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/23/2006 - Lookin' For 'Good Vibrations' In The Life Of Brian Wilson

0823_catch.jpg Sometimes it's easy to forget how revolutionary this sounded back in 1966.

(cue "Good Vibrations")

The songs Brian Wilson wrote and recorded with the Beach Boys are some of the most dizzlingly catchy pop music ever recorded. But his notoriously unhappy life remains a puzzle, even to people who love the music.

The psychological problems and drug abuse that marked his career have become the stuff of legend.

Peter Ames Carlin is a big Brian Wilson fan -- and also TV critic for the Oregonian. He's written a new biography that attempts to unravel Wilson's complex inner life.

It's called Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson.

Carlin sat down with OPB's April Baer recently to talk about why people seem so drawn to such a fragile person.

Complete article...

Also on Wednesday's Oregon Considered
BPA Looks To Create Two-Tiered Rate System For Power
Northwest Water Crisis: Odessa Aquifer Drying Up
Drawing The Line Between Religion And Politics

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/22/2006 - Washington State Democrats Courting the Latino Vote

0822_canvas.jpgLatinos traditionally vote Democratic, come election time. Northwest Democrats want to keep it that way.

They also want to capitalize on the momentum of the huge turnout of Hispanics last spring at immigration marches across the region.

Correspondent Carol Cizauskas went out with Democratic canvassers in Sunnyside, Washington and files this report.

Complete article...

Also on Tuesday's Oregon Considered
Firefighters Use Backfires To Control Mt. Hood Complex Fires
Portland Officials Call For Healthcare For All Oregon's Children
Portland Art Museum Names New Director
Film Documents Efforts To Rescue Pets After Katrina

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/21/2006 - Counterpoint Program Offers Help For Juvenile Sex Offenders

0821_welder.jpgYou hear a lot about sex offenders in the media these days.

Which ones are classified as predatory and how you can find out where they live. But some say all the attention that's paid to labeling and tracking these felons may lead people to overlook the bigger threat.

Children are much more likely to be violated by someone they trust -- like a neighbor, a relative or a member of their immediate family.

What most people don't know is that a significant number of abuses are committed by minors. The good news is that those who treat offenders say juveniles -- unlike hardened adult offenders -- can often be treated successfully.

And that's what Morrison Child and Family services has been doing in Multnomah County for more than 2 decades. Its Counterpoint program boasts a recidivism rate of 2 percent and graduates like Jack Stone, who's learning to become a welder.

Complete article...

Also on Monday's Oregon Considered
KPCN Will Give Voice To Valley Farm Workers
- View an audio slideshow of the KPCN work weekend
Jefferson Students, Parents Rally To Support School

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/17/2006 - Testing For Bird Flu Begins In NW

0817_testing.jpgHow to put this next story delicately? Biologists are swabbing the rear ends of a whole bunch of area ducks, geese, and sandpipers.

They're ruffling feathers to provide early warning for the deadly strain of bird flu.

Correspondent Tom Banse has more on the start of testing for avian flu in the Northwest.

Complete article...

Also on Thursday's Oregon Considered
Senators Plan Expanded Mt Hood Wilderness Bill
Mult. County Gives SUN Program Reprieve
Tighter Regulations Creating Welfare Headaches

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/16/2006 - The Promise Of Juniper Ridge

0816_juniperridge.jpgOne project that seems to encompass all the dimensions of Bend's exponential growth is the region's most ambitious project to date: Juniper Ridge. It's expected to have some affordable housing. But backers also tout living wage jobs, and even a four-year university.

Advocates have called it a "utopia." Critics use the word "boondoggle."

Wednesday night, Bend city councilors are expected to approve a Memorandum of Understanding, signaling a significant step forward. In this last installment of our series, Rob Manning reports on the promise of Juniper Ridge.

Complete article...

Also on Wednesday's Oregon Considered

Is The Portland Housing Bubble Deflating?
Modified Grass Found Growing Beyond Control Area
Meet The Horse Undertaker: A Man Alone In His Field

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/15/2006 - Bend's Growth Squeezing Out Affordable Housing

0815_bend1.jpgRising home prices in Bend and Redmond are hurting aspects of the area's economy.

Meanwhile, local officials are worried enough about the loss of affordable places that they discussed options with residents of mobile home parks.

In the second part of our series on growth, Rob Manning reports on what's being done to help central Oregonians afford housing.

Complete article...

Also on Tuesday's Oregon Considered

The Lighter Side Of The Immigration Debate
Large Turnout Shows Support For Roadless Areas
Crowded Field Vying For Idaho Congressional Seat

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/14/2006 - Program Provides Meals During Summer Vacation

0814_lunch2.jpgPublic schools are for education. For low-income families, they're also a source of child care and meals.

But what happens in the summer, when children in poverty might be left alone while their parents work?

Correspondent Carol Cizauskas visited White Swan in south-central Washington to look at a program that bridges the summertime gap.

Complete article...

Also on Monday's Oregon Considered

Housing Shortage Causing Worker Shortage In Central Oregon
Looking To The Future Of Rural Oregon
Wildfires Close Two Oregon Highways

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/10/2006 - Hoover's Beaver State Connection

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Today is Herbert Hoover's birthday. He happens to be the only US president who lived in Oregon. He was born in Iowa, but was orphaned as a child. He then moved to Newberg, Oregon, to live with his aunt and uncle. It was 1885, and Hoover was eleven. Beth Hyams spoke with Tim Walch at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, to learn a bit more about Hoover's six years in Oregon.

Click here to listen to the extended interview.

Photo courtesy of Herbert Hoover Presidential Library.

Also on Wednesday's Oregon Considered

New Program Highlights Household Asthma Triggers
Travelers Face New Restrictions At PDX
Westlund Quits Governor's Race
Mystery Of Ocean 'Dead Zone' Deepens

Posted by Casey

8/9/2006 - Older Students Having Trouble Reaching Benchmarks

0809_schools.jpgWe got another clue Wednesday about how Oregon's public school students are doing.

Last week, the feds gave their up-or-down evaluations under the No Child Left Behind Act. Wednesday, more detailed results have come from the state assessment. But regardless of whose test you're using, the results are similar.

Younger students do well. Older kids, struggle.

Yet at the individual school level, there are some particular highs and lows. Rob Manning has the numbers, and a look at one North Portland high school.
Complete article...

Also on Wednesday's Oregon Considered

Filmmakers Launch Into Frantic 48 Hour Project
Candidates Turning To Podcasting To Get Message Out

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/8/2006 - Wine Growers Provide Health Clinic For Workers

Just as Willamette Valley wine growers need the warm sun and soft rain to nourish their grapes, they also need a ready supply of labor at just the right moment.

Those migrant workers face a difficult life. One month they're picking grapes for one employer, the next it's berries for someone else and then Christmas trees for yet another business.

The temporary nature of the work means there's usually no healthcare. A minor infection or health problem can quickly become life-threatening if it's not taken care of.

To tackle the problem, wine growers in the five counties that make up the Northern Willamette Valley get together each year to raise money for a mobile health clinic.

Kristian Foden-Vencil visited the clinic and files this report.
Complete article...

Also on Tuesday's Oregon Considered

Could You Survive 30 Days On The Low-Car Diet?
Beaverton Council Says No To Wal-Mart

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/7/2006 - Water Cop Keeps the Peace in Walla Walla Basin

0807_watermaster.jpgThere's a saying in the rural West: "Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting." That's why there are more than 130 watermasters across the Northwest.

Essentially, they're cops. Their job is to keep the peace among farmers whose livelihoods depend on water.

Correspondent Austin Jenkins recently went on patrol with a watermaster in Washington's Walla Walla basin.
Complete article...

Also on Monday's Oregon Considered

Beaverton Council Faces Wal-Mart Decision
Medford Police Arrest Mike's Gulch Protestors
Measure 37 Brings Recall Attempt In Jefferson County

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/3/2006 - Oregon Poet Laureate Lawson Inada

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The Willamette Writer's conference kicks off in Portland Friday. At a banquet on Saturday, the group will give a lifetime achievement award to Oregon poet Lawson Inada.

Inada has written about everything from growing up in Fresno, CA to jazz, to his family's experience in the Japanese American internment camps in World War II.

He was named Oregon's poet laureate, and he teaches at Southern Oregon University.
Listen to his interview with OPB's Eve Epstein
Listen to Inada's poem 'Radio'

Also on Thursday's Oregon Considered

Stream And Trail Watchers Fight Crime
Small Morning Quake Rattles Area
Mercy Corps Aiding Lebanese Displaced By Fighting

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/2/2006 - Federal Officers Make Charges In Endangered Species Case

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The U.S. Attorney in Portland has charged five people with selling an endangered species and three others will be paying fines for smuggling federally protected animals.

The case involves the ocelot, a rare cat that looks like a small leopard. A new age spiritual organization in California, that sponsors an ocelot sanctuary, has entered into a plea agreement.

Ley Garnett has more on the federal investigation and efforts to preserve the ocelot.


Read the full story...

Also on Wednesday's Oregon Considered

Adults Play in the Mud in Annual Footrace
Tribes Demonstrate For Klamath River Dam Demolition
Salvage Logging Issue Comes Before Congress

Posted by Michael Clapp

8/1/2006 - Some Black Crater Evacuees Return Home

0801_sistersfire.jpgCooler temperatures and a secure fire line are helping fight the Black Crater fire southwest of Sisters Tuesday. It's 30% contained and the lull means 1,000 residents have returned home.

But families from 200 homes in the Crossroads subdivision and Edgington Road have to wait until tonight to find out if they can return.

Read the full story...

Also on Tuesday's Oregon Considered

Investigator Finds Sohappy Case Frustrating
'Rail' Still Rockin' Years After MTV Break
Federal Judge Sides With Bush Administration On Roadless Rule

Posted by Michael Clapp