Thousands of years before present
Approximately 80 tribes of Native Americans inhabit the region we define as Oregon today.

1700s
Spanish galleons explore the coast of Oregon.

1792
Captain Robert Gray enters the river we now call the Columbia, and names it after his ship, the Columbia Rediviva.

1800s
Oregon's streams, rivers, and lakes teem with fish and beaver. Commerce in beaver pelts attracts explorers, trappers, and traders to the region.

1804-1806
Captains Lewis and Clark travel with their party from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River.

1843
Civil government is established in the Oregon Country. Major immigration to Oregon begins along the Oregon Trail, with over 53,000 people traveling the Oregon Trail between 1840 and 1850.

1846
Francis Parkman travels in the West and later writes about his travels, which stimulates interest in the Oregon Trail.

1847
Measles decimate native tribes.

1848
The Oregon Territory is organized. Gold is discovered in California.

1859
Congress ratifies the Oregon State Constitution, and the state accepts the congressional proposal to be admitted to the Union.

1862
Congress passes the Homestead Act, allowing 160 acres to those who would live on and work the land. Gold is discovered in eastern Oregon, in Baker and Grant counties.

1867
The first salmon cannery on the lower Columbia begins production.

1872
Modoc Indian War.

1877
Nez Perce War.

1878
Bannock Indian War. Salmon canning increases from 10,000 cases in 1869 to 450,000 cases in 1878. Salmon becomes the leading export after wheat and flour.

1883
The transcontinental railroad is established.

1893
Portland's outdoor club, the Mazamas, holds its organizational meeting on the top of Mt. Hood, with 155 men and 38 women at the summit.

1902
Pres. Theodore Roosevelt signs a measure approving Crater lake as the 7th national park in the United States.

1905
The World's Fair, also known as the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition, is held in Portland, which ignites interest in tourism in Oregon.

1915
Columbia Gorge Highway is built beside the Columbia River.

1917
The United States enters World War I.

1929
The Great Depression begins.

1930
The 275,000 acre Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge is established as a federal wildlife refuge.

1933
The Tillamook Burn, one of the United States' worst forest fires, destroys 240,000 acres of timber.

1935
Civilian Conservation Corps projects, called Franklin Roosevelt's "Forest Army," begin in Oregon. Trails, parks, and amenities are built at Silver Falls and at hundreds of other sites in forests of the Cascade Mountains.

1937
Timberline Lodge, built as a Works Progress Administration project, is dedicated by President Franklin Roosevelt.

1941
The United States enters World War II.

1957
The Dalles Dam, which floods the major Indian fishing area on the Columbia -- Celilo Falls -- is completed.

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs invest part of their $4 million Celilo Falls settlement to develop a recreation facility called Kah-Nee-Ta.

1963
Congress passes the Clean Air Act.

1967
Oregon Beach Bill is signed into law by Gov. Tom McCall, decreeing that all land within sixteen vertical feet of the average low tide mark belongs to the people of Oregon.

1968
Wild and Scenic Rivers Act is passed by Congress.

1970
The National Environmental Policy Act is enacted.

1971
The Oregon Bottle Bill is approved, the first in the nation.

Governor Tom McCall invites people to "Come visit us again and again. This is a land of excitement. But, for heaven's sake, don't come here to live."

1973
Congress passes the Endangered Species Act.

1977
Confederated Tribe of Siletz wins restoration of trust relationship.

1978
Congress lists the Oregon Trail as a National Historic Trail.

1982
Cow Creek Band of Upper Umpqua Indians wins restoration.

1983
Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde wins restoration.

1984
Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians win restoration of trust relationship.

1990
Northern Spotted Owl is listed as a threatened species by the U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife.

1993
Oregon Trail 150th Anniversary Celebration.

1994
Northwest Forest Plan expands environmental protection on 24 million acres of of northern spotted owl forests.

Today
Tourism is Oregon's third leading industry.