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How Does Your Garden Grow?

OPB | March 28, 2008 midnight | Updated: Sept. 10, 2013 8:40 p.m.

How is climate change changing your garden?

Emily Harris heads out to the garden with Ketzel Levine this week In case you don?t know Ketzel, she is the ?doyenne of dirt? ? NPR?s gardening expert ? and a senior correspondent for Morning Edition. And lucky for us, she lives right here in Portland.

So now that spring is officially here we figured it was time to spend some time with Ketzel to talk about what?s blooming, and what?s not, in our yards.

On Friday we’re going to focus specifically on how climate change is changing what we grow. Are you seeing the lilacs bloom earlier this year? Are plants that usually lose their leaves acting more like evergreens? Are you able to plant something new that you haven’t put in your garden before? Are you a farmer experiencing different pests or different crop possibilities?”

Does your changing garden mean changing varieties? Does it mean you?re interested in planting some non-native plants?

Share your stories (and your photos) of your garden at the beginning of spring? and we?ll check in again as the summer arrives. Even if it’s few days earlier than usual.

GUESTS:

Ketzel Levine: Senior Correspondent for Morning Edition and NPR?s Gardening Expert since 1992.

UPDATE FROM EMILY AT BISHOP’S CLOSE:

I wandered through the Elk Rock Garden of the Bishop’s Close with Ketzel yesterday afternoon. It is certainly spring! Sweet bundles of edgeworthia perfumed the air. Electric pink rhododendron buds packed in all the anticipation of the season. Luscious magnolias dropped their thick white and cream petals on the wet grass.

Kezel forgave my confession that I usually call magnolias tulip trees. She revels in the magnolia “eggs” - the fat buds perched on the tip of a twig.

I must have been hungry - I saw an egg in the edgeworthia too.

Photo credits: From the Bishop’s Close, Kezel Levine. Other, Multmatsherm / Flickr / Creative Commons

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