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Semi-Nomadic Community Tries To Stay On Land

OPB | Aug. 27, 2013 12:20 p.m. | Updated: Sept. 11, 2013 1:21 a.m.

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Land Liberation Project

Ande and Kayla Blanchflower wound up on Dave and KC Mosby’s land by accident. They thought it was land owned by the Bureau of Land Management, but they were about 100 feet off.

Ande had moved from Wales where he had been living in a tipi village along with a couple hundred other people. When he came here, Kayla says, “there was no other option for him” — he had to live in a tipi. 

So the couple set off for a place to do that, and ended up on the Mosby’s land. Dave Mosby said at first, someone trying to live on your land “raises your eyebrows,” but he and KC soon came to feel the Blanchflowers “were wholesome,” so the Mosbys decided to charge them one dollar a day to live there (which covered the property taxes). The arrangement has been successful, and several other families have moved onto the land to form a semi-Nomadic “Tipi Village.” The group spends the winter in the valley, and the summer in the hills.

But a few weeks ago, Dave Mosby’s dad died, leaving the Mosby family with some of the debt he had accumulated. The property has to be sold for the Mosby children to pay their bills. The family is giving the Tipi Village families first priority to buy the land. The residents have started a crowdfunding page to try to do that, but with just over a month to go, they’re not even at one percent of their goal. The land would not be owned by one individual, Kayla Blanchflower explains, but would be managed by a non-profit and would be available for anyone to live there.

GUESTS:

  • Kayla Blanchflower: Resident of Tipi Village
  • Dave Mosly: Ranch Manager

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