Results for Think Out Loud (Other Results)

Local Lunch

Grilled cheese sandwiches and tomato soup may not seem like the advance guard of a revolution, but that's exactly what Representative Brian Clem (D-Salem) is hoping for. Along with Rep. Tina Kotek, he's sponsoring House Bill 2800, which would provide up to $19 million in state money for schools that spend some of their federal dollars on Oregon food. What's Oregon food? Anything that was "produced, packaged, packed or processed" in the state. This is where the grilled cheese sandwiches come in.

Segmentarticle - March 20, 2009

CD-1 Election Night Returns

1/31/12 8:50PM UPDATE: Suzanne Bonamici has won the race and will become the representative for Oregon’s First Congressional District. Today, voters in the First Congressional District pick their candidate to fill former Congressman David Wu's vacant seat. Think Out Loud is live tonight at 9pm and we'll sit down with OPB political analyst Bill Lunch to pore over the results, what they mean for Oregon, and what they tell us about the national races in November. We'll also hear from OPB News reporter April Baer, who will be live at the Ecotrust building in downtown Portland with Suzanne Bonamici's campaign. OPB's Chris Lehman will also join us, live with Rob Cornilles's campaign at the World Forestry Center in Portland. Tune in for the results.

Segmentarticle - Feb. 1, 2012

The Changeover: Attorney General

How much will Obama's AG pick change?

Segmentarticle - Jan. 15, 2009

Election Night Special 2010

It's election night 2010. Tonight we'll bring you the local results from the Northwest as they come in and we want to hear from you. Follow the results on OPB News and let us know your thoughts about the results as they happen.

Segmentarticle - Nov. 3, 2010

The 2010 Election Divide

Last month John Kitzhaber won the governor's election by a one percent margin. But while seven of 36 counties favored him, outside of the Portland-metro area, some counties favored his opponent Chris Dudley by as much as 70%. No Democrat was ousted at the federal level, but Democrats lost supermajority status in the state Senate. And the state House, which was once dominated by Democrats, is now evenly split 30-30. According to a survey (pdf) that OPB and Fox 12* commissioned, half of Oregonians feel optimistic about the election results, but the other half feels pessimistic. Statistically, the correlating factors show that those feeling optimistic tend to be Democrats residing in urban areas, and those who feel pessimistic tend to be Republicans in rural areas. Of course, there is much more nuance to the survey results, but purely by the numbers, these statistics point to a dividing line between rural and urban Oregon. The idea of a rural-urban divide is not new — in Oregon and many other states. Across America, people in small towns and big cities often have contrasting ideologies. But the history of Oregon politics shows times when rural Oregon was predominantly democratic and Portland was largely republican. Various factors like the mechanization of agriculture and environmental issues like the spotted owl led to fundamental shifts in political leanings. One way to understand Oregon politics today is to explore Oregon politics in the past. 

Segmentarticle - Dec. 6, 2010

66 and 67 Have Passed. Now What?

After an expensive and often rancorous battle, measures 66 and 67 passed on Tuesday night by a wider margin than expected. But there are still — there are always! — questions. First and foremost: Now what? What will these tax measures mean for Oregon? What budget or fiscal measures should the legislature focus on in their upcoming session? Does this "band-aid," as some have called these revenue measures, mean that a more wholesale revenue restructuring is less likely?

Segmentarticle - Jan. 27, 2010

Election Night Special

What races or measures, bonds or levies, have you biting your fingernails?

Segmentarticle - Nov. 4, 2008

The Morning After

Now what?

Segmentarticle - Nov. 5, 2008

Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben's latest article about climate change in Rolling Stone magazine — Global Warming's Terrifying New Math — quickly went viral. There were 4,000 comments on the website and 100,000 likes on Facebook. As we discussed with McKibben a few years ago on our show, climate change has been central to his work for decades now, but global climate conditions have only worsened in that time. The "terrifying new math" he writes about includes: 2° Celsius: the number of degrees climate change scientists agree we must not raise the global temperature above. That global temperature has already risen by .8 degrees. 565 Gigatons: the amount of carbon dioxide those scientists say we can add to the atmosphere and perhaps stay below that two degree threshold. 2,795 Gigatons:the estimated amount of carbon dioxide that we're currently planning on adding.

Segmentarticle - Aug. 16, 2012

Farm Bill Passes out of Senate

The Farm Bill mainly serves two purposes: Aid farmers in case of bad crops or devastating weather Provide funds to nutritional programs and food stamps On Thursday, the House passed a version of the Farm Bill that would cost nearly $1 trillion dollars over ten years. The aid programs would shift from direct fixed payments to subsidizing insurance programs for crops. The bill may face a harder road through the House of Representatives, where the Republican majority wants to see cuts to the food stamps program.

Segmentarticle - June 22, 2012

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