Results for Think Out Loud (Other Results)

Professor Yong Zhao On How To Educate Globally Competitive Students

We'll talk with University of Oregon education professor, Yong Zhao, about how schools could be educating students to be creative and innovative thinkers.

Segmentarticle - Oct. 1, 2013

Nancy Golden Talks About How To Improve Education In Oregon

We talk with Nancy Golden, Oregon's new Chief Education Officer, following Rudy Crew's departure.

Segmentarticle - Oct. 9, 2013

Oregon Tech Education

A recent survey of Oregon technology industry executives indicates a growing concern over the quality of tech education at the state's universities.

Segmentarticle - Nov. 18, 2013

What Can Montessori Teach Public Education?

Portland is hosting the 2013 International Montessori Congress this weekend. The Congress is held every four years, but this is the first time in over four decades that it's been held in an American city. Some argue that the Montessori philosophy is incompatible with the way America has structured its public education system, but a handful of schools are trying to make it work. One of the major differences between public education and Montessori schools is Montessori schools don't grade and tend to downplay, or totally avoid, standardized testing. These differences, along with a pressure to conform to state standards can be a point of friction for Montessori schools trying to operate in public districts. But the schools also focus on character education, which is something critics of the American education system point out as a blindspot in how we educate our kids. That approach has led some public districts across the country to try to adopt Montessori systems in their schools.

Segmentarticle - Aug. 2, 2013

Summer Online Education

Students at Hillcrest Elementary in North Bend were given the option to try out an online learning program last summer. Teachers hoped that the program would help prevent the typical regression that many students experience over the many months of summer vacation. The program offered rewards — like offering $20 and an ice cream party for the students that used the program the most over the summer. Administrators say the program was a success, and now they're trying to expand it for use during the school year. But they're still working out some of the kinks, including how to make sure that students without reliable internet access don't get left out.

Segmentarticle - Nov. 8, 2011

Oregon's Education Future

President Obama announced on Friday that states that agree to a certain set of rules can waive restrictions set by No Child Left Behind. States would need to set strong teacher evaluation standards, and have plans to rework under-performing schools in order to receiver the waiver. Ben Cannon, former teacher and Oregon legislator, is Governor Kitzhaber's new education policy adviser, and he's excited at the possibility of Oregon getting some leeway within No Child Left Behind. We'll check in with Cannon to see how the Governor and Department of Education will go about trying to waive the restrictions. We'll also hear what Cannon's broader ideas for Oregon's education system are, and how his experience as a teacher and legislator will affect his plans.

Segmentarticle - Sept. 26, 2011

Higher Education Update

The 2011 legislative session is scheduled to wrap on June 30, if not sooner. Before it does, we're looking at the bills affecting higher education that are still on the table. Two bills affecting higher education funding and a new decision-making body are moving through the legislature. The state higher education operating budget is expected to pass without surprises. Static between University of Oregon President Richard Lariviere and the Oregon State Board of Higher Education came to light in a pared down renewal contract for Lariviere. The board will present him a contract that conditionally extends his position for just one year.

Segmentarticle - June 21, 2011

What's Next for K-12 Education?

In this election voters in many Oregon counties had to decide whether to take money from their pockets to improve schools across the state. The results were mixed. In Portland the $548 million school bond to upgrade buildings failed by a slim margin while the less controversial levy passed. In Parkrose the bond to replace a middle school and improve others, passed by a slim margin. And in Eugene an income tax to pay for schools was defeated 64 to 36 percent. Today we'll explore what these results mean for education today — and in the future. Now that this election is over, and decisions have been made, what's next?

Segmentarticle - May 18, 2011

Rethinking Elite Higher Education

Portland writer William Deresiewicz argues in his new book, "Excellent Sheep," that America's system of elite colleges is bad for students — and society.

Segmentarticle - Aug. 12, 2014

Oregon's First Education Officer: Rudy Crew

During the 2011 legislative session, Governor John Kitzhaber pushed through a bill that makes the governor the superintendent of public instruction. The bill requires the governor to appoint a deputy superintendent to run the education department and oversee the schools. Last month, Kitzhaber named former head of New York City schools, Rudy Crew, as his chief education officer. Crew began his job this week. Crew has a long history in public education. He spent four years each as the head of the New York City and Miami-Dade County school systems. But both positions ended on bad terms due to disagreements with the school boards. But the appointments were not without achievements such as reducing overcrowding and improving test scores.

Segmentarticle - July 3, 2012

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