Results for Think Out Loud (Other Results)

Seniors Affected by Foreclosure

A recent report from the AARP found the mortgage crisis took quite a toll on older Americans, leaving 1.5 million people over the age of 50 without homes since 2007. The report (pdf) says, “Despite the perception that older Americans are more housing secure than younger people, millions of older Americans are carrying more mortgage debt than ever before.” The report also showed the fastest rise of mortgage debt belonged to Americans 75 or older. The percentage increase of seriously delinquent loans among people 50 years or older also made headlines, increasing about 456 percent from 2007 to 2011. 

Segmentarticle - July 23, 2012

Fear of Foreclosure

Drive down any residential street these days and it is likely you'll see at least a For Sale sign or two. You might even catch sight of an ominous Foreclosure notice. For some people this signals the possibility of a great deal. For others it evokes fear, as the economy continues to suffer. Could your home be next? On July 30th, Governor Kulongoski signed a bill aiming to prevent unnecessary home foreclosures in Oregon. The legislation makes new requirements of lenders: they must make a “good faith effort” to consider modifying the borrower’s loan; and they must notify borrowers whose homes might be foreclosed upon that they have a right to meet with the lender. The legislation passed following a significant spike in home foreclosures across Oregon in the first half of 2009. Oregon now ranks eleventh in the nation for foreclosures. There have been 19,503 foreclosure-related actions in the last six months. Portland, Salem and Eugene all had at least double the number of foreclosures compared to the first half of 2008. It’s speculated that this rise in foreclosure activity might have more to do with unemployment than subprime mortgages.

Segmentarticle - Aug. 10, 2009

Candidate Conversation: Portland Mayor 2012

Are you trying to decide who to vote for this November for Mayor of Portland? If so, here's your opportunity to hear both candidates, Charlie Hales and Jefferson Smith, answer the tough questions about the future of the city. From fluoride to foreclosures, development to diversity, we'll get the straight talk from both of them on the issues of most importance to Portlanders. The event will take place in the OPB Television studio. It will air live on OPB Radio and OPB Plus, with a rebroadcast on OPB TV later in the week. Follow along and participate in the discussion on our Live Blog: <a href="http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=37b611c10c" data-mce-href="http://www.coveritlive.com/mobile.php/option=com_mobile/task=viewaltcast/altcast_code=37b611c10c">Candidate Conversation: Portland Mayor 2012</a>

Segmentarticle - Oct. 9, 2012

Statehouse Update

A committee of lawmakers in Salem heard a somewhat optimistic revenue forecast this week. The Legislative Emergency Board, which meets to do the state's business between sessions, is also close to voting on a plan to fund a program to help with the foreclosure problem and monitor mortgage fraud. Meanwhile, the official unemployment rate for the state is down. Harry Esteve covers politics for The Oregonian and joins us for an update.

Segmentarticle - May 24, 2012

Talking Business

Changes are afoot at the North Park Blocks in Portland. Two colleges — Pacific Northwest College of Art and Oregon College of Oriental Medicine — are resettling near Portland's Old Town neighborhood in the coming years. The colleges will bring over 1000 students, instructors, and staff members to the urban area currently dotted with many social services. Neighborhood advocates hope it will bring increased economic activity to an area that some see as blighted. In other business news, analysts are seeing an increase in small business loans, a good sign of a recovering economy (though real estate trends remain relatively dismal). Meanwhile, the battle over the economics of several potential coal terminals in the Northwest continues to rage, with each side lobbing arguments over the economic wisdom of going forward.

Segmentarticle - May 10, 2012

Demand For Housing Counselors

One of the new Oregon laws to come out of the short legislative session in February adds a step in the foreclosure process that could help homeowners. The law allows homeowners to request mediation with their bank when foreclosure is imminent. It also requires banks to honor homeowners' requests for mediation. The first step homeowners must take to kick off the mediation process is to request a meeting with a federally certified housing counselor. The law doesn't go into effect for a few months, but counselors are already seeing a sharp increase in demand for their services. Similar laws exist in Washington and other states, but some say they're not doing much to keep people in their homes. Either troubled homeowners don't know about the programs or they don't believe that mediation will motivate banks not to foreclose.

Segmentarticle - March 30, 2012

Legislative Check-In

The Oregon Legislature had a self-imposed goal to wrap up its first constitionally mandated short session by February 29, but it looks like that's not going to happen. (Technically, lawmakers have until March 6 to finish up.) The budget plan released last week has yet to be officially passed and legislators appear to be deadlocked over the governor's school policy bills, changes to the way foreclosures work, and a few other things. Oregonian capitol reporter Michelle Cole will join us once again to give us an update on what's going on in Salem as the legislature hurtles towards the finish line.

Segmentarticle - March 1, 2012

Help for Oregon Homeowners

In the last show we did live from the state capitol, we talked to two political reporters about the progress toward adjournment. We got an update on where the budget stood with the co-chairs of the Ways and Means Committee. And, at the end of the hour, we discussed conflict-of-interest legislation. But throughout the hour a lot of people online (and some on the phones) wanted to know about possible foreclosure bills — and amendments to them. KXPX wrote: What about foreclosure reform? In less than a month, the Oregonian has had three editorials about legislators needing to address it this session. Jane B said: SBs 1552 (pre foreclosure mediation) and 1564 (ending the dual track) are SUPER IMPORTANT this session. Give homeowners a fighting chance to save their homes and get the economy back on track. Jane B also mentioned the new emergency rule put out by Attorney General John Kroger that would make mortgage lenders subject to Oregon consumer protection law. We didn't have a chance to talk about those bills last week — or the new emergency rule the Attorney General recently put out about mortgage lenders, so today, that's on the proverbial table. Have you lost your home to foreclosure? Are you trying to negotiate with your lender to make your house payment?

Segmentarticle - Feb. 27, 2012

Talking Business

Portland Business Journal editor Rob Smith will be in studio for our regular business update. Here are some of the topics we'll be looking at: An $8.5 billion multi-bank settlement over deficient mortgage and foreclosure practices A brewing fight over the ownership of Tully's coffee Brick-and-mortar retail sales getting trounced by online shopping during the holidays 

Segmentarticle - Jan. 8, 2013

Talking Business

We begin a new regular segment where we check in on the local business buzz. Our series kicks off with a look into banks and housing. While banks caught up in the housing foreclosure debacle are hurting, others are showing confidence in the future by announcing expansions. JP Morgan Chase plans to open 21 branches around the Portland-metro area and hire as many as 500 employees by the end of 2012. Key Bank's expansion is underway and Portland-based Umpqua Bank may follow suit. News on the housing market has been mixed. Central Oregon is reporting a drop in foreclosures but Portland still holds the distinction of being No. 1 in missed mortgage payments. The "serious delinquency rates" are no surprise to industry analysts who say that the Northwest was last into the recession and it appears that it will be the last out.

Segmentarticle - Aug. 24, 2011

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