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Lauren Kessler Fights Aging

OPB | July 25, 2013 12:30 p.m. | Updated: Dec. 31, 2013 1:47 p.m.

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Chris Crisman

Lauren Kessler is a well-known Oregon writer of narrative non-fiction. She runs the multimedia journalism masters program at the University of Oregon and has penned twelve books exploring everything from Alzheimer’s to adolescence.

She’s been on Think Out Loud in the past to discuss both My Teenage Werewolf and Stubborn Twig and has talked about her writing — and her writing process — on Oregon Art Beat.

 

 

Now she’s taken on a new topic: anti-aging. Here’s what she says about age on her blog:

When the treadmill or elliptical or bike asks you to enter your age so it can calculate calories burned (or other helpful info), if you are entering your chronological age – the age on your driver’s license – you’re lying.  Your chronological age is NOT the age of your body (which is the age you should use for correct calculations).  Your chronological age is often not a true indicator of the health and vitality of your heart, lungs and vascular system.  The fitter – or unfitter – you are, the bigger the gap between chronological and biological age.

To ensure that her biological age is a good deal younger than her chronological age, Kessler cleanses and fasts. She sweats it out and thinks young. She has a muscle biopsy, measures her mitochondria, and has Dysport injections (which are similar to Botox). She considers full-fledged plastic surgery but ends up with supplements, superfoods and lots of exercise instead.

We’ll talk with Kessler about what she discovered. What is the secret to staying young?

Editor’s Note: The website Lauren Kessler mentioned on our show is The Linus Pauling Institute for Micronutrient Information.

What’s your secret?

GUEST:

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