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Mike Daisey's Marathon Monologue

OPB | Sept. 16, 2011 9:30 a.m. | Updated: Sept. 10, 2013 10:37 p.m.

The monologist Mike Daisey came to Portland a year ago as part of the 2010 Time-Based Art festival. His show was The Agony and The Ecstasy of Steve Jobs, and it combined a biography of the Apple founder with a sobering look at where our tech toys come from. (The short answer: very low-paid, often very young workers in enormous Chinese factories.) The show was alternately harrowing and hilarious. But even more intriguing was something he announced at the end of the festival: that he hoped to come back this year with a 24-hour hour monologue.

I actually sat down with Daisey last year to talk about his plans. (The interview aired as part of a pilot for The Speakeasy, and you can listen to it here.) He was still in the early stages of planning this gargantuan project, and he wasn’t even sure if it was physically possible.

Well, we’re all about to find out.

Daisey’s All The Hours In The Day is having its world premiere starting on Saturday at 6pm and going through Sunday at 6pm:

Combining song, dioramas, pageantry, surprise guests, unexpected developments, devastating reversals, and the keen possibility of failure, Daisey will strive like Scheherazade to create a universe with a daring and fearless audience.

And my favorite bit from the rest official description:

Do not worry. We will take care of you. It will be an adventure.

The Portland Mercury has also put together some handy answers to pertinent logistical questions.

But if you have questions for Mike Daisey before he embarks on this heroic, potentially insane journey, you’ll get a chance to ask him directly. He’s joining us on the show to talk about time, monologues, and mania. What do you want to know?

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