Follow us

Contributed By:

The Value of Mount Hood

OPB | June 10, 2011 9:06 a.m. | Updated: Sept. 10, 2013 10:12 p.m.

Kevin Kohnstamm and his brothers grew up in Portland but they were on Mount Hood nearly every weekend at the lodge their dad Richard operated on the mountain. Timberline Lodge wasn’t just any old place — it was a kind of second home. Today, Kevin says whenever anyone hears of his connection to Timberline, he inevitably hears a story. Those stories aren’t so notable for what actually happens in them. Rather, it’s that the memories are so vivid and the emotions are so available, even years after the events described. And Kevin and his brothers aren’t alone: about two million people a year visit Timberline — and more than four and half million visit the national forest

OPB News is beginning a series called Mt. Hood, Inc., which will try to gauge the value (economic, and otherwise) of the mountain. The series is loosely based on the hypothetical question, what if Mount Hood were a corporation? To kick it off, we’ll be looking at the mountain through the eyes of its “biographer,” in conversation with people who work, play and pray there, and with someone who makes a living in the fast-growing field of ecosystems economics. (That’s a newish discipline that essentially tries to put dollars values on environmental elements.)

What does Mount Hood mean to you? What’s your history with the mountain? How often do you see it or visit? How much is it worth to you?

Editor’s Note: We’ll be broadcasting this show live from the lobby of Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood. If you’re in the area please join us in the audience! Please come by at about 8:30. The show, of course, will broadcast live at 9 a.m.

GUESTS:


Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus
Thanks to our Sponsors:
become a sponsor

Related

Thanks to our Sponsors
become a sponsor

Funding Provided By

Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust

James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation

Dawn and Al Vermeulen

Ray and Marilyn Johnson