Contributed By:

Scott Silver

Northwest Passages: William Gibson

OPB | Sept. 14, 2010 9 a.m. | Updated: Sept. 10, 2013 9:37 p.m.

Michael O'Shea

Vancouver, B.C.-based author William Gibson first rose to fame for his seminal 1984 science fiction novel Neuromancer. The novel imagined a future in which rebellious hackers commit crimes in a digital virtual reality. The book won all three major science fiction awards that year, the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Award and the Hugo Award. In 2005, Time Magazine named Neuromancer among the 100 best English-Language novels since 1923, calling the book “violent, visceral and visionary.”

Gibson’s new book Zero History is the most recent of three novels set in the present time, though with an eye turned decidedly towards people living on the outskirts of mainstream society and at the vanguard of new technologies and ideas.

His characters try to navigate a rapidly-changing world, in which technology becomes omnipresent in our daily lives, changing how we communicate, how we create and consume art, music, culture and fashion, and changing our relationship with political and geographical boundaries.

What questions do you have for William Gibson?

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