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Stacy Bolt Talks About Breeding In Captivity

OPB | Aug. 26, 2013 12:35 p.m. | Updated: Sept. 11, 2013 1:21 a.m.

Amy McMullen

Stacy Bolt is among the 1.5 million women in the U.S. who deal with infertility. Theassisted reproduction industry is estimated at 4.26-billion-dollars-a-year in the U.S. Bolt’s new memoir, Breeding in Captivity, captures the human side of these numbers. It recounts her early days of infertility diagnosis (and her reaction to the medical “advanced maternal age” label in her mid-30s), her travels down the assisted fertility road and her harrowing experience trying to adopt. Despite the subject matter, and against all odds, Bolt makes it funny.

Here’s a brief excerpt from the beginning of the book, about what she found the bookstore: 

There were half a dozen Oh You Poor, Poor Barren Woman titles butting right up next to 1001 Awesome Baby Names!

The book I ended up buying was called Taking Charge of Your Fertility. Because taking charge is better than just lying back and waiting for nature to take its course, which, so far, was not working at all. 

This book shocked me. Because, get this: There’s a specific way to get pregnant. And it doesn’t involve having sex all the time. It involves having sex at exactly the right time. I didn’t know this. I really didn’t. My knowledge of my own reproductive system was laughable. This is how I remember having The Sex Talk with my mother:

     Me: We did Sex Ed in health class today. 

     Mom: (uncomfortable silence)

     Me: They gave me a pamphlet

     Mom: Oh good. Do you, umm, have any questions? 

     Me: No, I guess not.

Do you have experience with infertility or domestic adoption? What would you like to ask her Stacy Bolt about Breeding in Captivity?

GUEST:

  • Stacy Bolt: Humorist, author of Breeding in Captivity: One Woman’s Unusual Path to Motherhood

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Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust

James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation

Dawn and Al Vermeulen

Ray and Marilyn Johnson