A group of youth plaintiffs prepare to march to a news conference outside of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after a three-judge panel heard oral arguments over whether President Trump and his administration can evade a constitutional climate change trial Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in San Francisco. 21 young plaintiffs and the organizational plaintiff Earth Guardian assert the U.S. government, through its affirmative actions has violated their constitutional rights to life and failed to protest essential public trust resources.

A group of youth plaintiffs prepare to march to a news conference outside of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after a three-judge panel heard oral arguments over whether President Trump and his administration can evade a constitutional climate change trial Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in San Francisco. 21 young plaintiffs and the organizational plaintiff Earth Guardian assert the U.S. government, through its affirmative actions has violated their constitutional rights to life and failed to protest essential public trust resources.

Eric Risberg/AP

Attorneys for a group of youths suing the U.S. government over climate change were back in court Monday, arguing before a federal appeals court that it should reject a government request to dismiss the case and instead allow it to go to trial in Eugene, Oregon.

While Monday’s hearing happened in San Francisco before a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, some of the plaintiffs’ biggest fans gathered in a lecture hall on the University of Oregon campus to watch a live feed of the proceedings.

“The kids represent the future … and all of them have a story” about how climate change affects them, said Patty Hine, cofounder of 350 Eugene. The local nonprofit group, which works to raise awareness about issues surrounding climate change, organized the watch party in Straub Hall. Nearly 50 people attended.

Plaintiffs in the federal case include 21 youths ages 10 to 21, along with well-known climate scientist James Hanson. Six of the plaintiffs are from Eugene; 11 of them are from Oregon.

Read the whole story at The Register-Guard.