Ya-Po-Ah Terrace resident Judy Crow peers out her 14th-floor window at the train tracks that run through downtown Eugene. Crow is hoping a quiet zone can be enacted to decrease the noise from horns warning of engines approaching crossings.

Ya-Po-Ah Terrace resident Judy Crow peers out her 14th-floor window at the train tracks that run through downtown Eugene. Crow is hoping a quiet zone can be enacted to decrease the noise from horns warning of engines approaching crossings.

Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard

Whether the end is near for the train horns that blast hundreds of times day and night through downtown Eugene may hinge on an important discussion and decision by city leaders next week.

Public debate has rumbled along for years about whether the city should upgrade rail crossings in the city center to create a railroad “quiet zone.”

The city seeks to spend millions of dollars on upgrades at 10 rail crossings in downtown and the Whiteaker neighborhood so trains would no longer be subject to federal regulations that require engineers to repeatedly blast their horns to alert pedestrians and motorists.

On Feb. 26, city councilors may vote to authorize the use of urban renewal dollars for the upgrades at two crossings next to the Eugene Water & Electric Board’s riverfront property. One other crossing already qualifies for that public money.

Read the whole story at The Register-Guard.