The undated photo released by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shows detainees walk in a line at the HHS' unaccompanied alien children program facility at Tornillo, Texas. The tents used at the facility are manufactured by Eugene-based Western Shelter Systems.

The undated photo released by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shows detainees walk in a line at the HHS’ unaccompanied alien children program facility at Tornillo, Texas. The tents used at the facility are manufactured by Eugene-based Western Shelter Systems.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services via AP

The large portable tents made by Eugene-based company Western Shelter Systems have been used for people displaced by hurricanes and earthquakes, fighting wildfires and potentially infected with Ebola.

But today, Western Shelter tents are being put to a more controversial use in Tornillo, Texas: housing hundreds of teenagers and children who tried to illegally cross the Mexican border.

The camp, which some have dubbed a “tent city,” was erected quickly this spring near the Rio Grande to help enforce President Donald Trump’s new “zero tolerance” immigration policy. That policy resulted in more immigrants and asylum-seekers being detained and more families being separated at the border, which prompted widespread national outrage last month.

And, although Trump signed an executive order ending family separation on June 20, his “zero tolerance” policy is still in place. The ultimate outcome of that order is expected to be more undocumented immigrant families detained together in new ad hoc and temporary detention facilities — a potential boon to federal contractors such as Western Shelter Systems that equip them.

Read the whole story at The Register-Guard.