This past fall, the drinking water at Emerald Christian Academy, in Lane County’s Pleasant Hill, was tested and found to have 12 times the regulatory limit for lead.

Fourth graders Emi Vu Magee and Brian Emmrich carry packages of bottled water back to their classroom at Valley Inquiry Charter School in Salem on Wednesday, March 16, 2016. Students and staff at the school have been drinking bottled water since March 2015, after high levels of copper were found in their water supply. The school previously had problems with lead levels in 2011 and 2014, but after replacing pipes and fixtures they tested within regulatory limits twice in 2015.

Fourth graders Emi Vu Magee and Brian Emmrich carry packages of bottled water back to their classroom at Valley Inquiry Charter School in Salem on Wednesday, March 16, 2016. Students and staff at the school have been drinking bottled water since March 2015, after high levels of copper were found in their water supply. The school previously had problems with lead levels in 2011 and 2014, but after replacing pipes and fixtures they tested within regulatory limits twice in 2015.

Molly J. Smith/Statesman Journal

At Kidco Head Start Sunnyside, near Sweet Home, results showed six times the limit. The limit is 15 parts per billion, set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

And water at Vale’s Willowcreek Elementary School, in Malheur County, came in slightly over the limit.

In all, 10 Oregon schools have exceeded regulatory limits for lead in drinking water over the past four years, according to data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. That’s nearly a quarter of the public water systems statewide — all flagged for high lead levels.

Read more at the Statesman Journal.