Now Playing:

News

local | Election | News | Politics

Voters Reject Measure 90's 'Top Two' Primaries


2014 Measure 90 - Top-Two Primaries

Creates a nonpartisan primary for all candidates. The top two would advance to the general election, regardless of party.

Amelia Templeton

Oregon voters have rejected Measure 90, which would have created a nonpartisan primary for all candidates. The top two would have advanced to the general election, regardless of party.

For now, to vote in a primary for a partisan office, Oregon voters have to belong to a major political party. That means the one-third of Oregon voters with no major party affiliation can’t vote. Measure 90 would have changed that.

Oregon’s Democratic and Republican parties were united in their opposition to Measure 90, saying it could reduce options for voters by allowing two candidates from the same party to advance to the general election, for example. Supporters, meanwhile, contended that the top-two primary measure would have reduced partisanship and spur candidates to appeal to a broader range of voters.

Among the largest individual contributions made to any candidate or measure on the Oregon ballot this year was spending in support of Measure 90 - $500,000 from a Texas billionaire.

Measure 90 election election 2014 top-two primary