Ashley Mayer and her father, David, unload cans and bottles Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, to turn into dimes to pay for Ashley's kidney transplant.

Ashley Mayer and her father, David, unload cans and bottles Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, to turn into dimes to pay for Ashley’s kidney transplant.

Andy Atkinson/Mail Tribune

The 10-cent deposit for an empty beer or soda bottle might seem like an insignificant amount of money to most people, but it could add up to the difference between life and death for one Medford family.

One by one by one, Medford resident David Mayer feeds bottles and cans into the machines at the bottle return facility on Stowe Avenue, and he views every container he drops inside as another 10 cents closer to the kidney transplant that could save his daughter Ashley’s life.

Ashley, 24, has been in kidney failure since the age of 12. So far, she and her father have raised just over $7,260, which translates into more than 72,600 sticky metal and glass containers, inserted one by one into the slow machines. A third of the time, the machine beeps with an error message and kicks the bottle or can back out — try again. And try again they do.

All told, they need at least $10,000, or 100,000 bottles, to meet a fundraising goal set by transplant officials who require patients to prove they can cover transplant-related costs such as expensive anti-rejection medication.

Read the whole story at the Mail Tribune.