Jon Don Ilone Reed, an Army veteran and member of South Dakota's Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, poses for a photo at an oil pipeline protest near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in southern North Dakota, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Reed said he fought in Iraq and is now fighting "fighting for our children and our water."

Jon Don Ilone Reed, an Army veteran and member of South Dakota’s Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, poses for a photo at an oil pipeline protest near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in southern North Dakota, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Reed said he fought in Iraq and is now fighting “fighting for our children and our water.”

James MacPherson/AP

Jackie Many Hides packed her car Thursday morning with school supplies, food, water and a flag. Her destination: North Dakota.

The state has become a battleground for tribal rights and environmental activists over the installation of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers arguing that the agency acted illegally by taking a “narrow view” of its responsibilities before approving the pipeline, which is expected to carry 470,000 barrels of crude oil per day from North Dakota to Illinois. A judge is expected to rule on a preliminary injunction by September 9.

Many Hides volunteered to carry Oregon’s Grand Ronde flag to North Dakota to join the Sioux in their protest. The tribe has staged a sit-in on the border of its reservation, which runs along the path of the pipeline. The protest has garnered national attention and support from tribes from around the country, including several tribes in the Pacific Northwest.

Grand Ronde passed a resolution Aug. 31 supporting the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

To read more, visit the Statesman Journal.