Sheri and Tom Eckert spoke to the Exploring Psychedelics conference in Ashland, Oregon, about partially legalizing the mind-altering, non-addictive psilocybin.

Sheri and Tom Eckert spoke to the Exploring Psychedelics conference in Ashland, Oregon, about partially legalizing the mind-altering, non-addictive psilocybin.

John Darling/Ashland Daily Tidings

While psychedelic drugs rose to prominence in the 1960s, the attendees at an Ashland conference say the nation and world would be a better place if the non-addictive drugs regained their footing in society.

The “peace and love” message of the ’60s — inspired in part by psychedelic drugs — hasn’t changed over the last five decades, speakers told the approximately 300 attendees at the fourth annual Exploring Psychedelics conference, held May 25-26 at Southern Oregon University.

Pointing to a “spiritual crisis in the west,” conference organizer Martin Ball, an SOU adjunct faculty member, said mind-altering substances such as psilocybin mushrooms have been a positive part of culture since the beginning of history. But the federal government’s War on Drugs over the last 50 years demonized the non-addictive “entheogens” (literally: generating god within) and pushed the movement to the periphery of society.

“A psychedelic renaissance is underway as researchers and society learn of its benefits in health, healing and creativity in art, music, philosophy and a greater understanding of how to solve society’s problems,” says Ball. “We’re not talking about back-alley druggies and Grateful Dead concerts here. These are important members of our society.”

Read more at Ashland Daily Tidings.