In this 2015 photo, over 30 bicycle riders and advocates gathered outside of Oregon Department of Transportation offices in Portland, Oregon. The riders gathered to protest unsafe road conditions after a cyclist lost a limb in an accident.

In this 2015 photo, over 30 bicycle riders and advocates gathered outside of Oregon Department of Transportation offices in Portland, Oregon. The riders gathered to protest unsafe road conditions after a cyclist lost a limb in an accident.

Casey Minter/OPB

Traffic-related deaths in Portland continued to increase in 2017, despite the City Council’s approval of Vision Zero policies intended to eliminate all fatal and serious injury crashes by 2025.

Forty-five people were killed on city streets last year, making 2017 the deadliest year since 2003, when 47 people were killed, according to the first annual Vision Zero report released by the Portland Bureau of Transportation on Tuesday.

The total is one more than the 44 people who died in 2016. The greatest increase happened among pedestrians, whose deaths jumped from 13 in 2016 to 18 in 2017, according to the report.

The increase happened despite several steps taken under the Vision Zero Action Plan adopted by the council in November 2016. They include spending $15.4 million on safety projects on 21 High Crash Network streets and intersections last year. PBOT also launched a new Safe Ride Home program that provided 3,389 coupons for discounts on safe travel options during high-DUII holidays or events in 2017.

Read the full article at The Portland Tribune.