Jennifer Berg of the Washington State Department of Agriculture sets traps in Waterfront Park in Vancouver, Washington.

Jennifer Berg of the Washington State Department of Agriculture sets traps in Waterfront Park in Vancouver, Washington.

Dameon Pesanti/The Columbian

Look into the trees around Vancouver open spaces this summer, and you might notice a lot of milk carton-sized orange and green boxes dangling from the branches.

The Washington State Department of Agriculture workers are setting 34,000 traps around the state to catch the much-loathed European and Asian gypsy moths after 42 of the insects were found in Washington last summer.

Vancouver will have a high concentration of the traps because one Asian gypsy moth — the more problematic of the two varieties — was found at the Port of Vancouver last year.

European and Asian gypsy moths are voracious eaters of more than 100 plant varieties. They’ve have wreaked havoc on forests in 19 Northeastern and Midwestern states. They spread quickly and have extensively damaged hundreds of thousands of acres of forests, which, in turn, harms agriculture, wildlife habitat and stream quality. Once a population is established, it’s practically impossible to eradicate them.

Read more at The Columbian.