The Willamette Stone, located in a small park off Portland's Skyline Boulevard, marks a key milestone in the colonization of Oregon.

The Willamette Stone, located in a small park off Portland’s Skyline Boulevard, marks a key milestone in the colonization of Oregon.

Claudia Meza/OPB

If you’ve been feeling like the lines are blurring between the America you imagined and the America we all live with, take a listen. We found some incredible artists and writers addressing the magical thinking and fantasies that shaped our world.

Ever visited the Willamette Meridian? Tucked away in a tiny state park on Portland’s Skyline Drive, you’ll find a little metal plate that marks the meridian line around which all other Oregon mapping lines are organized. We begin this week’s journey here, considering the expansionist imaginings that gave rise to modern-day Oregon.


Abigail DeVille's complex installations marry elements like this cluster of found toys. Around the corner, visitors take in a viewing of "Arresting Power: Resisting Police Violence in Portland, Oregon" by Jody Darby, Julie Perrini, and Erin Yanke.

Abigail DeVille’s complex installations marry elements like this cluster of found toys. Around the corner, visitors take in a viewing of “Arresting Power: Resisting Police Violence in Portland, Oregon” by Jody Darby, Julie Perrini, and Erin Yanke.

Claudia Meza/OPB

Artist Abigail DeVille’s American Future - 2:53

Artist Abigail DeVille creates macro-sized art installations that bring stories of marginalized communities to vivid life. Her site specific works — like “The American Future,” on view at PICA this weekend — use found objects, architectural forms, and natural materials. They’re fantastically complex and immersive, inviting you to stroll around, or sit and contemplate her inquiries into the most highly redacted American narratives.

“The American Future” took a full year of preparation and research. Taking as her point of departure the ideals of Thomas Jefferson, it’s structured around massive forms recalling Monticello and other neoclassical archetypes. But her assemblies juxtapose these powerful forms with reminders that American philosophies haven’t always matched up with American practice — from Jefferson’s slaveholding to modern-day Portland’s breathtaking housing crisis (the installation incorporates thousands of back issues of “Street Roots,” Portland’s weekly street newspaper).

Abigail DeVille’s massive installation is on view at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art’s Hancock building in Northeast Portland starting this weekend through Jan. 12.


Leni Zumas' previous novel, "The Listeners," was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award.

Leni Zumas’ previous novel, “The Listeners,” was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award.

Sophia Shalmiyev/Courtesy of Little, Brown, and Company

Illusions of Freedom in Leni Zumas’ “Red Clocks”  - 18:46

Portland writer Leni Zumas’ novel “Red Clocks” imagines a world in which reproductive rights for women have been more or less eliminated. Her future, not terribly distant from 2018, is built around an ideology rooted in traditional gender roles. Zumas introduces us to four women, and weaves their lives together in a narrative that’s satisfied readers, and her own questions about biology and identity.

“I was doing research on fertility treatments for my own sake,” Zumas told us, “and I happened to stumble upon something: the Personhood Amendment. Versions of this have been proposed by lots of lawmakers. It really captured my imagination and my fear.” Find her at Portland Book Festival next weekend.


Typhoon performs from its new album, "Offerings," at the OPB studio.

Typhoon performs from its new album, “Offerings,” at the OPB studio.

Dave Christensen/OPB

Typhoon’s Journey Through Memory - 28:09

If you wanted a soundtrack for a journey into our collective fantasies, the latest record from the band Typhoon, “Offerings,” might be the thing. This 10-piece outfit fronted by Kyle Morton has never lacked for ambition. But the high-concept music in this record raises the bar.

Offerings” came out in January 2018. It imagines one man’s descent into a world of illusions as he experiences memory loss and madness. Morton asks, if we forget our past, what’s left of us? It’s a powerful allegory for an entire culture losing itself.

We talked with Morton and got treated to live performances in a special, extended opbmusic session in January. Typhoon is on a break and working on new music for 2019.


Journalist and writer Omar El Akkad wrote the novel "American War."

Journalist and writer Omar El Akkad wrote the novel “American War.”

Courtesy Michael Lionstar

Illusions of Safety: Omar El Akkad’s “American War” - 37:30

As a reporter for the Toronto Globe and Mail, Omar El Akkad has seen a lot of conflict. He’s filed stories from Egypt during the Arab Spring, and covered military trials at Guantanamo Bay, refugee camps in Afghanistan, and the Black Lives Matter movement. Something from each of these events found its way into his novel “American War.” It’s a story about a family living in the South during the latter part of the 21st century, where political extremism has erupted into a second American Civil War.

The novel, El Akkad explains, was born of his own frustration with the chasm Americans perceive between their own lives and those ensnared by global conflicts. Is their suffering all that different? As he explained to “Think Out Loud,” his fiction offered a larger canvas to explore the idea than even his reporting could provide.

Omar El Akkad will be at the 2018 Portland Book Festival. 

Music Heard On 'State Of Wonder'

A Spotify playlist to share all the music we feature on our show and anything else that inspires us while we’re making it.