What exactly is art supposed to do about the state of the world in 2018? Carry a political flag? Make us forget about bad things? This week we’ve got a pile of stories for you about what art can do in traumatic times. Man-of-all-bands Papi Fimbres talks about meeting the weirdness of 2018 head-on with a radical act of self-care. The hilarious and amazing comedian Caitlin Weierhauser tells us about processing tragedy in the spotlight. Cult of Orpheus founder Christopher Corbell dreams up new myths and narratives for a troubled world. The Manila Sound shows the way through a time of martial law.


Mikey Hortaleza (DJ Grim) on the hunt for Filipino records in Manila.

Mikey Hortaleza (DJ Grim) on the hunt for Filipino records in Manila.

Courtesy of Mikey Hortaleza

Getting Down with The Manila Sound — 1:45

The Manila Sound is a genre of Filipino music that came to prominence in the 1970s. Under the Marcos regime, the country went through a brutal period. But that time also gave rise to disco music in the Philippines. Slowly but surely through this decade, the country shifted from a more colonial mentality, to a sense of itself. If your’e ready to hear it live, Spirit Mountain Casino is hosting a show called Manila Disco Fever Aug. 25. 


Members of the ensemble the Cult of Orpheus in rehearsal.

Members of the ensemble the Cult of Orpheus in rehearsal.

Claudia Meza/OPB

The Cult of Orpheus: The Emerald Tablet — 8:25

Alt-classical ensemble the Cult of Orpheus is getting ready for its fifth anniversary concert at the Alberta Rose Theatre Aug. 25. This group of 20 musicians, including string players and classically trained singers, came together to create a new sound for classical, with original compositions and narratives that speak to the modern world. The group released its first album, “Sacred Works I: The Emerald Tablet,” this year. The anniversary concert will include selections from “Emerald Tablet” and other works.


Voted Portland's Funniest Person in 2017, Caitlin Weierhauser has a dynamic stage style that takes on gender stereotypes without compromise.

Voted Portland’s Funniest Person in 2017, Caitlin Weierhauser has a dynamic stage style that takes on gender stereotypes without compromise.

Gabriel Michael/Courtesy of Caitlin Weierhauser

Caitlin Weierhauser on Working it Out Onstage — 15:50

Caitlin Weierhauser is one of the smartest stand-up artists we know. A Lane County native, Weierhauser has been working in Portland as a stand-up and storyteller for about five years. They’re getting ready to make the move to Los Angeles in October, but you can see Weierhauser opening for Simon Gibson at the Funhouse Aug. 18. We sat down to talk about technique and why unfunny material sometimes belongs onstage.


Theo Craig, of the band Máscaras, at Homiefest 2018.

Theo Craig, of the band Máscaras, at Homiefest 2018.

Claudia Meza/OPB

A Radical Act of Self-Care: Papi Fimbres’ Homiefest — 38:25

Papi Fimbres is one the hardest-working musicians we know, with 17 different bands on his schedule. And yet, he might be the chillest person you will ever meet. We’re not entirely sure what his secret is, but it may have something to do with the fact that he always makes time for his friends. For five years, Fimbres has been putting on a word-of-mouth music festival as a way to escape the everyday stresses of the world. We join Papi and friends at an undisclosed location in Clackamas County for a lesson in radical self-care.