Tawasi Soce is a gig driver - of people and packages - for various companies. He sent OPB recordings of what his days are like during the pandemic.

Tawasi Soce is a gig driver - of people and packages - for various companies. He sent OPB recordings of what his days are like during the pandemic.

Tawasi Soce

 

  

  • Oregon’s child welfare system was facing any number of challenges before the coronavirus pandemic hit. With Gov. Kate Brown’s stay at home order in effect, schools are closed and caseworker home visits are shut down. Many of the state’s foster parents — and foster children — find themselves in need of more help than ever. In response to the pandemic, the Department of Human Services has launched the My Neighbor program, run by its partner, Every Child. The program aims to provide immediate help for foster families from individuals living in their neighborhoods. We talk with Ben Sand, who helps run the program and with Rebecca Jones Gaston, who directs the child welfare department at DHS.

 

  

  • About 100 years ago, another pandemic was sweeping across the United States: the influenza pandemic of 1918. It was one of the deadliest events in history: it infected as many as one in every four people on the planet. Christopher McKnight Nichols, director of the Oregon State University Center for the Humanities, recently wrote a column in the Washington Post about the 1918 pandemic. He tells us what we can learn from the 1918 pandemic to handle the coronavirus pandemic in 2020.

 

  

  • Tawasi Soce is a gig driver - of people and packages - for various companies. He sent OPB recordings of what his days are like during the pandemic.

 

  

  • As the only resident of remote Andrews, Oregon, for the past 10 years, painter John Simpkins is used to the solitary quarantine lifestyle. We hear from Simpkins about dealing with a global pandemic in a ghost town.

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