Jessie Walters holds up a golden eagle during an educational session at the Teton Raptor Center in Wilson, Wyo. Golden eagles have been dying of lead poisoning due to hunters’ bullets and conservationists disagree about how to address the problem.
 

Jessie Walters holds up a golden eagle during an educational session at the Teton Raptor Center in Wilson, Wyo. Golden eagles have been dying of lead poisoning due to hunters’ bullets and conservationists disagree about how to address the problem.  

Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio

 

  

  • Shortly after Colette Peters took over as director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) in 2012, she commissioned a study of Oregon correctional officers to assess their mental and physical health. Seven years later, DOC has an employee wellness center at each of the state’s 14 prisons. We talk with Peters about what has changed as a result.

 

  

 

  

  • Lead has been removed from paint, gasoline and plumbing, but not from bullets. When scavengers eat animals that have been shot with lead bullets, it can poison them. Leland Brown is a lifelong hunter who has been hired by the Oregon Zoo to teach other hunters the benefits of using non-lead bullets. 

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