Christina Walker with her son, Evan, and her daughter, Olivia, in their Portland, Tennessee, home. Walker fostered Olivia for two years before the adoption, and worked through a number of serious behavior issues with the help of Youth Village's Intercept program.

Christina Walker with her son, Evan, and her daughter, Olivia, in their Portland, Tennessee, home. Walker fostered Olivia for two years before the adoption, and worked through a number of serious behavior issues with the help of Youth Village’s Intercept program.

Allison Frost/OPB

 

  

  • The Portland Business Alliance released its annual economic report. It showed eastern Multnomah County faces unique challenges. Those challenges include high costs for home renters, lower average wages than the rest of the region and wage disparities by race. Andrew Hoan is the President and CEO of the Portland Business Alliance.

 

  

  • Vancouver Public Schools recently announced it needs to cut 23 teachers and 33 full-time staff positions to make up a deficit. Evergreen Public Schools is also struggling to cut up to $18 million from its budget. Joel Aune, the Executive Director of the Washington Association of School Administrators, gives his take on the source of the problem.

 

  

  • Following last year’s damning audit of Oregon’s foster care system, we conducted a series of interviews with those directly involved, including parents, children and caseworkers. This year, in partnership with the Solutions Journalism Network, we’re exploring different approaches to child welfare. We traveled to Tennessee late last year to learn about Youth Villages, which focuses on help for biological and adoptive families to keep kids out of foster care. Youth Villages now operates in more than a dozen states, including Oregon. Last month, we talked with the organization’s Memphis-based CEO, Pat Lawler. Today, we sit down with Andrew Grover, the head of Youth Villages in Oregon to find out how its Intercept program is being used here. And we meet a Portland mom, Wendy Warren, who says she and her two adopted daughters found the counseling and support invaluable when they found themselves in crisis.

Contact "Think Out Loud"

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